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Contrasting Transmission Dynamics of Co-endemic Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: Implications for Malaria Control and Elimination

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, May 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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37 Dimensions

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Contrasting Transmission Dynamics of Co-endemic Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: Implications for Malaria Control and Elimination
Published in
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, May 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003739
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rintis Noviyanti, Farah Coutrier, Retno A. S. Utami, Hidayat Trimarsanto, Yusrifar K. Tirta, Leily Trianty, Andreas Kusuma, Inge Sutanto, Ayleen Kosasih, Rita Kusriastuti, William A. Hawley, Ferdinand Laihad, Neil Lobo, Jutta Marfurt, Taane G. Clark, Ric N. Price, Sarah Auburn

Abstract

Outside of Africa, P. falciparum and P. vivax usually coexist. In such co-endemic regions, successful malaria control programs have a greater impact on reducing falciparum malaria, resulting in P. vivax becoming the predominant species of infection. Adding to the challenges of elimination, the dormant liver stage complicates efforts to monitor the impact of ongoing interventions against P. vivax. We investigated molecular approaches to inform the respective transmission dynamics of P. falciparum and P. vivax and how these could help to prioritize public health interventions. Genotype data generated at 8 and 9 microsatellite loci were analysed in 168 P. falciparum and 166 P. vivax isolates, respectively, from four co-endemic sites in Indonesia (Bangka, Kalimantan, Sumba and West Timor). Measures of diversity, linkage disequilibrium (LD) and population structure were used to gauge the transmission dynamics of each species in each setting. Marked differences were observed in the diversity and population structure of P. vivax versus P. falciparum. In Bangka, Kalimantan and Timor, P. falciparum diversity was low, and LD patterns were consistent with unstable, epidemic transmission, amenable to targeted intervention. In contrast, P. vivax diversity was higher and transmission appeared more stable. Population differentiation was lower in P. vivax versus P. falciparum, suggesting that the hypnozoite reservoir might play an important role in sustaining local transmission and facilitating the spread of P. vivax infections in different endemic settings. P. vivax polyclonality varied with local endemicity, demonstrating potential utility in informing on transmission intensity in this species. Molecular approaches can provide important information on malaria transmission that is not readily available from traditional epidemiological measures. Elucidation of the transmission dynamics circulating in a given setting will have a major role in prioritising malaria control strategies, particularly against the relatively neglected non-falciparum species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Philippines 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 75 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 31%
Student > Master 13 17%
Unspecified 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 10%
Unspecified 7 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 8%
Other 23 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,755,258
of 13,469,606 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#2,905
of 6,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,426
of 228,642 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#94
of 184 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,469,606 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,111 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,642 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 184 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.