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A standardised tool for assessing needs in forensic psychiatric population: clinical validation of the Italian CANFOR, staff version

Overview of attention for article published in Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, October 2014
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Title
A standardised tool for assessing needs in forensic psychiatric population: clinical validation of the Italian CANFOR, staff version
Published in
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, October 2014
DOI 10.1017/s2045796014000602
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. Castelletti, A. Lasalvia, E. Molinari, S. D. M. Thomas, E. Straticò, C. Bonetto

Abstract

The Camberwell Assessment of Need - Forensic Version (CANFOR) is a standardised assessment tool specifically designed to assess needs for care in forensic psychiatric populations. The original English version of the instrument has shown good psychometric properties. The aim of this study was to validate the Italian version of the CANFOR-staff tool. After translation and back-translation, the Italian CANFOR tool was administered to a sample of 50 forensic psychiatric patients. Convergent validity was tested using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) by applying Kendall's tau-b. Inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities were measured by ICCs for need dimensions (total and unmet) and Cohen's kappa coefficients for individual need items. Regarding convergent validity, a higher number of needs (total and unmet) were associated with more severe psychiatric symptoms (BPRS). Higher numbers of unmet needs were also associated with lower levels of global functioning (GAF). ICCs for total and unmet needs scores indicated a good level of agreement for inter-rater reliability and a very good level for test-retest, respectively. Regarding the specific items, inter-rater Cohen's kappa was high (moderate to very good agreement) for 18 items in relation to the presence of a need and for 15 items in the rating of an unmet need, whereas Cohen's kappa for test-retest reliability was very high for all the items in the presence of a need and high for 18 of the unmet need domains. The Italian version of CANFOR has adequate psychometric properties. It can be considered a promising instrument for the assessment of needs of forensic psychiatric patients.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 25%
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 4 50%
Unspecified 1 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 13%
Neuroscience 1 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 13%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2015.
All research outputs
#3,571,027
of 5,085,441 outputs
Outputs from Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
#158
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Outputs of similar age
#116,390
of 161,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
#13
of 24 outputs
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