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The global activity limitation indicator and self-rated health: two complementary predictors of mortality

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Public Health, May 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
The global activity limitation indicator and self-rated health: two complementary predictors of mortality
Published in
Archives of Public Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13690-015-0073-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicolas Berger, Johan Van der Heyden, Herman Van Oyen

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to compare the ability of the Global Activity Limitation Indicator (GALI) and self-rated health (SRH) to predict all-cause mortality in the general adult population. We linked the 2001 Belgian Health Interview Survey with mortality and migration registers 2001-2010. The baseline sample included 8,583 individuals aged 15 years and older. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the effect of the GALI and SRH on mortality rate during follow-up. We investigated the impact of gender, age, education and follow-up period on the association between the GALI/SRH and mortality. The GALI and SRH were strong and complementary predictors of mortality in the Belgian adult population. Although the two global instruments shared some traits, they predicted mortality concurrently, with some indication of a somewhat stronger effect for SRH. We found neither significant differences between men and women, nor between education groups. The predictive effect of the GALI and SRH slightly decreased over time and the predictive effect of SRH slightly decreased with age. Our findings suggest that the GALI and SRH are useful and complementary measures for assessing the health and functional status of adults in population surveys.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 26%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Other 3 11%
Professor 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 6 22%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 37%
Social Sciences 5 19%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2015.
All research outputs
#8,021,599
of 12,786,839 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Public Health
#289
of 362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,344
of 227,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,786,839 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,880 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them