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Differential contributions of hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex to self-projection and self-referential processing.

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychologia, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Differential contributions of hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex to self-projection and self-referential processing.
Published in
Neuropsychologia, May 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.05.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kurczek, Jake, Wechsler, Emily, Ahuja, Shreya, Jensen, Unni, Cohen, Neal J, Tranel, Daniel, Duff, Melissa, Jake Kurczek, Emily Wechsler, Shreya Ahuja, Unni Jensen, Neal J. Cohen, Daniel Tranel, Melissa Duff

Abstract

Converging evidence points to a neural network that supports a range of abilities including remembering the past, thinking about the future, and introspecting about oneself and others. Neuroimaging studies find hippocampal activation during event construction tasks, and patients with hippocampal amnesia are impaired in their ability to (re)construct events of the past and the future. Neuroimaging studies of constructed experiences similarly implicate the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but it remains unknown whether the mPFC is critical for such processes. The current study compares performance of five patients with bilateral mPFC damage, six patients with bilateral hippocampal damage, and demographically matched comparison participants on an event construction task. Participants were given a neutral cue word and asked to (re)construct events across four time conditions: real past, imagined past, imagined present, and future. These event narratives were analyzed for the number of internal and external details to quantify the extent of episodic (re)experiencing. Given the literature on the involvement of the mPFC in self-referential processing, we also analyzed the event narratives for self-references. The patients with mPFC damage did not differ from healthy comparison participants in their ability to construct highly detailed episodic events across time periods but displayed disruptions in their incorporation of the self. Patients with hippocampal damage showed the opposite pattern; they were impaired in their ability to construct highly detailed episodic events across time periods but not in their incorporation of the self. The results suggest differential contributions of hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex to the distributed neural network for various forms of self-projection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 3%
France 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 54 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 37%
Researcher 12 20%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 30 51%
Neuroscience 10 17%
Unspecified 7 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2015.
All research outputs
#302,768
of 7,983,071 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychologia
#84
of 2,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,818
of 208,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychologia
#3
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,983,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,809 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.