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Why Muslim women in Northern Ghana do not use skilled maternal healthcare services at health facilities: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC International Health and Human Rights, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
185 Mendeley
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Title
Why Muslim women in Northern Ghana do not use skilled maternal healthcare services at health facilities: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC International Health and Human Rights, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12914-015-0048-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Kuumuori Ganle

Abstract

Muslim women are one sub-population in Ghana among whom the rate of skilled maternal health services accessibility and utilisation is very low. However, there are no studies in Ghana that explore the maternity needs and care experiences of Muslim women, and why they do not utilise maternal healthcare services at health facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore the maternity healthcare needs and care experiences of Muslim women and the barriers to accessing and using maternal health services. Qualitative research was conducted with 94 Muslim women in three communities in northern Ghana between November 2011 and May 2012. Data were analysed using the Attride-Stirling's thematic network analysis framework. Findings suggest that although Muslim women do want to receive skilled care in a health facility, they often experience difficulties with accessing and using such services. These difficulties were often conditioned by a religious obligation to maintain bodily sanctity through modest dressing and the avoidance of unlawful bodily exposure or contact with certain people including male or alien caregivers. Other related access barriers include lack of privacy, healthcare providers' insensitivity and lack of knowledge about Muslim women's religious and cultural practices, and health information that lacked the cultural and religious specificity to meet Muslim women's maternity care needs. Maternal healthcare services designed to meet the needs of mainstream non-Muslim Ghanaian women might lack the flexibility and responsiveness to meet the unique maternity care needs of Muslim women. Recommendations for change include cultural competence training for healthcare providers and cultural/religious matching to meet Muslim women's care needs and to enhance their care experience.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 185 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Unknown 182 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 13%
Researcher 21 11%
Student > Bachelor 19 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 37 20%
Unknown 29 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 42 23%
Social Sciences 38 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 17%
Psychology 7 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 3%
Other 23 12%
Unknown 38 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2015.
All research outputs
#4,761,072
of 17,467,242 outputs
Outputs from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#202
of 394 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,402
of 237,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,467,242 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 394 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,251 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them