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Alta prevalência de sedentarismo em adolescentes que vivem com HIV/Aids

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Paulista de Pediatria, September 2015
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  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 261)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Alta prevalência de sedentarismo em adolescentes que vivem com HIV/Aids
Published in
Revista Paulista de Pediatria, September 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.rpped.2014.12.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luana Fiengo Tanaka, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira Latorre, Aline Medeiros Silva, Thais Claudia Roma de Oliveira Konstantyner, Stela Verzinhasse Peres, Heloisa Helena de Sousa Marques

Abstract

To assess the prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents with HIV/Aids, as well as associated factors. Ninety-one adolescents (from 10 to 19 years old) with HIV/Aids who are patients at a university follow-up service were interviewed. Anthropometric data (weight, height, and waist circumference) were measured twice; clinical information was obtained from medical records, and habitual physical activity was assessed by a questionnaire proposed by Florindo et al. The cutoff point for sedentariness was 300minutes/week. The prevalence of inadequate height for age, malnutrition, and overweight/obesity was 15.4%, 9.9% and 12.1%, respectively. The most common physical activities were soccer (44.4%), volleyball (14.4%) and cycling (7.8%). The median times spent with physical activity and walking/bicycling to school were 141minutes and 39minutes, respectively. Most adolescents (71.4%) were sedentary and this proportion was higher among girls (p=0.046). A high prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents with HIV/Aids was observed, similarly to the general population. Promoting physical activity among adolescents, especially among girls with HIV/Aids, as well as monitoring it should be part of the follow-up routine of these patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 51%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 8 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 20%
Social Sciences 5 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2015.
All research outputs
#3,308,529
of 12,484,918 outputs
Outputs from Revista Paulista de Pediatria
#16
of 261 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,428
of 229,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Paulista de Pediatria
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,484,918 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 261 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,352 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them