↓ Skip to main content

Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: survival and differentiation

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, May 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: survival and differentiation
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0087-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leyan Xu, Jiwon Ryu, Hakim Hiel, Adarsh Menon, Ayushi Aggarwal, Elizabeth Rha, Vasiliki Mahairaki, Brian J Cummings, Vassilis E Koliatsos

Abstract

Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is an extremely common type of traumatic brain injury encountered in motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, and in combat. Although many cases of DAI result in chronic disability, there are no current treatments for this condition. Its basic lesion, traumatic axonal injury (TAI), has been aggressively modeled in primate and rodent animal models. The inexorable axonal and perikaryal degeneration and dysmyelination often encountered in TAI calls for regenerative therapies, including therapies based on stem cells and precursors. Here we explore the proof of concept that treatments based on transplants of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (hOPCs) can replace or remodel myelin and, eventually, contribute to axonal regeneration in TAI. We derived hOPCs from the human embryonic stem cell line H9, purified and characterized them. We then transplanted these hOPCs into the deep sensorimotor cortex next to the corpus callosum of nude rats subjected to TAI based on the impact acceleration model of Marmarou. We explored the time course and spatial distribution of differentiation and structural integration of these cells in rat forebrain. At the time of transplantation, over 90 % of hOPCs expressed A2B5, PDGFR, NG2, O4, Olig2 and Sox10, a profile consistent with their progenitor or early oligodendrocyte status. After transplantation, these cells survived well and migrated massively via the corpus callosum in both injured and uninjured brains. Human OPCs displayed a striking preference for white matter tracts and were contained almost exclusively in the corpus callosum and external capsule, the striatopallidal striae, and cortical layer 6. Over 3 months, hOPCs progressively matured into MBP (+) and APC (+) oligodendrocytes. The injured environment in the corpus callosum of impact acceleration subjects tended to favor maturation of hOPCs. Electron microscopy revealed that mature transplant-derived oligodendrocytes ensheathed host axons with spiral wraps intimately associated with myelin sheaths. Our findings suggest that, instead of differentiating locally, hOPCs migrate massively along white matter tracts and differentiate extensively into ensheathing oligodendrocytes. These features make them appealing candidates for cellular therapies of DAI aiming at myelin remodeling and axonal protection or regeneration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 20%
Student > Master 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 8 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 25%
Neuroscience 14 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 13%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,362,910
of 7,128,274 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#293
of 545 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,693
of 205,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#24
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,128,274 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 545 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,287 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.