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Developing a community-led SMS reporting tool for the rapid assessment of lymphatic filariasis morbidity burden: case studies from Malawi and Ghana

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

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110 Mendeley
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Title
Developing a community-led SMS reporting tool for the rapid assessment of lymphatic filariasis morbidity burden: case studies from Malawi and Ghana
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0946-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle C. Stanton, Square Z. Mkwanda, Alexander Y. Debrah, Linda Batsa, Nana-Kwadwo Biritwum, Achim Hoerauf, Matthew Cliffe, Abigail Best, Andrew Molineux, Louise A. Kelly-Hope

Abstract

Lymphoedema and hydrocoele are the two most common clinical manifestations of lymphatic filariasis (LF). In order to effectively target morbidity management strategies, more information is rapidly needed on morbidity burden across all endemic countries. The purpose of this study was to develop and test an SMS tool (MeasureSMS) which enables trained community-based health workers to report basic information on all cases they identified. The tool was trialled in Chikwawa district, Malawi and Ahanta West district, Ghana in 2014. Salaried health surveillance assistants (HSAs) identified and reported cases in Malawi whereas volunteer community health workers (CHWs) were used in Ghana. Health workers were trained in recognising lymphoedema and hydrocoeles and submitting individual case data using MeasureSMS, after which they undertook a LF morbidity survey. After the reporting period, a random sample of reported cases was visited by a physician to verify the health workers' diagnoses. The proportion of correctly diagnosed cases i.e. the positive predictive value (PPV) was then calculated. HSAs in Malawi successfully reported 256 unique cases by SMS from 107 communities (166 hydrocoele, 88 lymphoedema, 2 with both), resulting in an estimated adult prevalence of 17.7 per 10,000 and 33.0 per 10,000 for lymphoedema and hydrocoele respectively. In Ghana, despite being less experienced in using SMS, CHWs successfully reported 360 unique cases by SMS from 33 communities (169 hydrocoele, 185 lymphoedema, 6 with both), resulting in an estimated adult prevalence of 76.9 per 10,000 and 70.5 per 10,000 adults for lymphoedema and hydrocoele respectively. The verification exercise resulted in a PPV for lymphoedema and hydrocoele diagnosis of 90 % (n = 42, 95 % CI 76.5 - 96.9) and 92 % (n = 49, 95 % CI 79.5 - 97.4) in Malawi and 94 % (n = 34, 95 % CI 78.9 %-99.0 %) and 47 % (n = 59, 35.1 %-61.7 %) in Ghana, indicating that non-invasive methods for diagnosing hydrocoeles needed to be further emphasised. The study concludes that given the appropriate education and tools, community-based health workers are exceptionally well-placed to participate in quantifying LF morbidity burden, and other NTDs with observable symptoms. This concept has the potential to enable national programmes to more effectively monitor their community impact in an efficient, timely and cost-effective way.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 109 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 23%
Researcher 23 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 11%
Unspecified 12 11%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Other 28 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 29%
Unspecified 24 22%
Social Sciences 13 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 7%
Computer Science 6 5%
Other 27 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2015.
All research outputs
#4,070,072
of 9,183,188 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,558
of 4,034 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,458
of 215,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#27
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,183,188 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,034 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.