↓ Skip to main content

Diet, exercise or diet with exercise: comparing the effectiveness of treatment options for weight-loss and changes in fitness for adults (18–65 years old) who are overfat, or obese; systematic review…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 199)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
233 tweeters
facebook
26 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
283 Mendeley
Title
Diet, exercise or diet with exercise: comparing the effectiveness of treatment options for weight-loss and changes in fitness for adults (18–65 years old) who are overfat, or obese; systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40200-015-0154-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

James E Clark

Abstract

There are number of means of methods to alter body composition, and metabolic issues, available for the adult who is overfat. The following is a systematic review and meta-analysis focused on comparing changes from treatment program for adults who are overfat based on analysis of aggregated effect size (ES) of inducing changes. So as to determine the relative effectiveness of such protocols and intervention plans of choice. This tiered meta-analysis of 66-population based studies, and 162-studywise groups, a clear pattern of ES being established across and within treatments. First, hypocaloric balance is necessary for changing body composition, but the effectiveness for establishing imbalance does not equate with the effectiveness for body compositional changes, or any biomarkers associated with metabolic issues. With analysis showing that there is a necessity to include exercise in combination with diet effectively elicit changes in body composition and biomarkers of metabolic issues. More importantly, the combination, resistance training (RT) was more effective than endurance training (ET) or combination of RT and ET, particularly when progressive training volume of 2-to-3 sets for 6-to-10 reps at an intensity of ≥75% 1RM, utilizing whole body and free-weight exercises, at altering body compositional measures (ES of 0.47, 0.30, and 0.40 for loss of BM, FM, and retention of FFM respectively) and reducing total cholesterol (ES = 0.85), triglycerides (ES = 0.86) and low-density lipoproteins (ES = 0.60). Additionally RT was more effective at reducing fasting insulin levels (ES = 3.5) than ET or ET and RT. Even though generally lower ES than RT, the inclusion of ET was more effective when performed at high intensity (e.g. ≥70% VO2max or HRmax for 30-minutes 3-4x's/wk), or in an interval training style than when utilizing the relatively common prescribed method of low-to-moderate (e.g., 50-70% VO2max or HRmax for at least equal time) steady state method, ES of 0.35, 0.39, and 0.13 for BM, FM, and FFM respectively. Thus indicating that focus of treatment should be on producing a large metabolic stress (as induced by RT or high levels of ET) rather than an energetic imbalance for adults who are overfat.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 233 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 283 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 3 1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 274 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 68 24%
Student > Master 60 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 11%
Researcher 23 8%
Student > Postgraduate 21 7%
Other 61 22%
Unknown 19 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 83 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 62 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 6%
Other 38 13%
Unknown 30 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 225. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2020.
All research outputs
#62,337
of 14,191,655 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders
#1
of 199 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,211
of 231,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,191,655 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 199 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them