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Spread of the Rat Lungworm ( Angiostrongylus cantonensis ) in Giant African Land Snails ( Lissachatina fulica ) in…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 633)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
8 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
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Title
Spread of the Rat Lungworm ( Angiostrongylus cantonensis ) in Giant African Land Snails ( Lissachatina fulica ) in Florida, USA
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, July 2015
DOI 10.7589/2014-06-160
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deborah D. Iwanowicz, Lakyn R. Sanders, W. Bane Schill, Maniphet V. Xayavong, Alexandre J. da Silva, Yvonne Qvarnstrom, Trevor Smith

Abstract

The rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis) is a parasitic nematode that causes rat lungworm disease. It is the leading cause of eosinophilic meningitis and is a zoonotic health risk. We confirmed the presence of A. cantonensis using species-specific, quantitative PCR in 18 of 50 (36%) giant African land snails (Lissachatina fulica) collected from Miami, Florida in May 2013. These snails were collected from seven of 21 core areas that the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services monitor weekly. Rat lungworms have not previously been identified in these areas. Duplicate DNA extractions of foot muscle tissue from each snail were tested. Of the seven core areas we examined, six were positive for A. cantonensis and prevalence of infection ranged from 27% to 100%. Of the 18 positive snails, only five were positive in both extractions. Our results confirm an increase in the range and prevalence of rat lungworm infection in Miami. We also emphasize the importance of extracting sufficient host tissue to minimize false negatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 12 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 22%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2018.
All research outputs
#874,102
of 14,468,394 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#20
of 633 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,838
of 232,315 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,468,394 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 633 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,315 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.