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Public attitudes towards pricing policies to change health-related behaviours: a UK focus group study

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Public Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Public attitudes towards pricing policies to change health-related behaviours: a UK focus group study
Published in
European Journal of Public Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1093/eurpub/ckv077
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire Somerville, Theresa M. Marteau, Ann Louise Kinmonth, Simon Cohn

Abstract

Evidence supports the use of pricing interventions in achieving healthier behaviour at population level. The public acceptability of this strategy continues to be debated throughout Europe, Australasia and USA. We examined public attitudes towards, and beliefs about the acceptability of pricing policies to change health-related behaviours in the UK. The study explores what underlies ideas of acceptability, and in particular those values and beliefs that potentially compete with the evidence presented by policy-makers. Twelve focus group discussions were held in the London area using a common protocol with visual and textual stimuli. Over 300 000 words of verbatim transcript were inductively coded and analyzed, and themes extracted using a constant comparative method. Attitudes towards pricing policies to change three behaviours (smoking, and excessive consumption of alcohol and food) to improve health outcomes, were unfavourable and acceptability was low. Three sets of beliefs appeared to underpin these attitudes: (i) pricing makes no difference to behaviour; (ii) government raises prices to generate income, not to achieve healthier behaviour and (iii) government is not trustworthy. These beliefs were evident in discussions of all types of health-related behaviour. The low acceptability of pricing interventions to achieve healthier behaviours in populations was linked among these responders to a set of beliefs indicating low trust in government. Acceptability might be increased if evidence regarding effectiveness came from trusted sources seen as independent of government and was supported by public involvement and hypothecated taxation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 7%
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 40 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 32%
Student > Master 13 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Unspecified 3 7%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 41%
Social Sciences 11 25%
Unspecified 5 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 7%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2017.
All research outputs
#567,458
of 12,024,798 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Public Health
#121
of 1,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,828
of 228,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Public Health
#5
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,024,798 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,926 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,257 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.