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Broadband Onset Inhibition Can Suppress Spectral Splatter in the Auditory Brainstem

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Broadband Onset Inhibition Can Suppress Spectral Splatter in the Auditory Brainstem
Published in
PLoS ONE, May 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0126500
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin J. Spencer, David A. X. Nayagam, Janine C. Clarey, Antonio G. Paolini, Hamish Meffin, Anthony N. Burkitt, David B. Grayden

Abstract

In vivo intracellular responses to auditory stimuli revealed that, in a particular population of cells of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) of rats, fast inhibition occurred before the first action potential. These experimental data were used to constrain a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model of the neurons in this circuit. The post-synaptic potentials of the VNLL cell population were characterized using a method of triggered averaging. Analysis suggested that these inhibited VNLL cells produce action potentials in response to a particular magnitude of the rate of change of their membrane potential. The LIF model was modified to incorporate the VNLL cells' distinctive action potential production mechanism. The model was used to explore the response of the population of VNLL cells to simple speech-like sounds. These sounds consisted of a simple tone modulated by a saw tooth with exponential decays, similar to glottal pulses that are the repeated impulses seen in vocalizations. It was found that the harmonic component of the sound was enhanced in the VNLL cell population when compared to a population of auditory nerve fibers. This was because the broadband onset noise, also termed spectral splatter, was suppressed by the fast onset inhibition. This mechanism has the potential to greatly improve the clarity of the representation of the harmonic content of certain kinds of natural sounds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 11 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 33%
Student > Master 2 17%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 33%
Neuroscience 4 33%
Unspecified 1 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2015.
All research outputs
#635,519
of 8,075,940 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#13,855
of 112,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,340
of 217,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#721
of 6,104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,075,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 112,445 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,201 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.