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Depression and diabetes: treatment and health-care delivery

Overview of attention for article published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
111 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
207 Mendeley
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Title
Depression and diabetes: treatment and health-care delivery
Published in
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, June 2015
DOI 10.1016/s2213-8587(15)00045-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frank Petrak, Harald Baumeister, Timothy C Skinner, Alex Brown, Richard I G Holt

Abstract

Despite research efforts in the past 20 years, scientific evidence about screening and treatment for depression in diabetes remains incomplete and is mostly focused on North American and European health-care systems. Validated instruments to detect depression in diabetes, although widely available, only become effective and thus recommended if subsequent treatment pathways are accessible, which is often not the case. Because of the well known adverse effects of the interaction between depression and diabetes, treatment goals should focus on the remission or improvement of depression as well as improvement in glycaemic control as a marker for subsequent diabetes outcome. Scientific evidence evaluating treatment for depression in type 1 and type 2 diabetes shows that depression can be treated with moderate success by various psychological and pharmacological interventions, which are often implemented through collaborative care and stepped-care approaches. The evidence for improved glycaemic control in the treatment of depression by use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or psychological approaches is conflicting; only some analyses show small to moderate improvements in glycaemic control. More research is needed to evaluate treatment of different depression subtypes in people with diabetes, the cost-effectiveness of treatments, the use of health-care resources, the need to account for cultural differences and different health-care systems, and new treatment and prevention approaches.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 202 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 17%
Student > Postgraduate 21 10%
Student > Bachelor 18 9%
Researcher 18 9%
Other 46 22%
Unknown 33 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 74 36%
Psychology 30 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 12%
Neuroscience 9 4%
Social Sciences 8 4%
Other 21 10%
Unknown 40 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#810,456
of 17,356,510 outputs
Outputs from The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
#522
of 1,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,595
of 238,911 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
#11
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,356,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,610 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 59.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,911 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.