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Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
221 Mendeley
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Title
Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, June 2015
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2015.0418
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heloise Gibb, Nathan J. Sanders, Robert R. Dunn, Simon Watson, Manoli Photakis, Silvia Abril, Alan N. Andersen, Elena Angulo, Inge Armbrecht, Xavier Arnan, Fabricio B. Baccaro, Tom R. Bishop, Raphael Boulay, Cristina Castracani, Israel Del Toro, Thibaut Delsinne, Mireia Diaz, David A. Donoso, Martha L. Enríquez, Tom M. Fayle, Donald H. Feener, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Crisanto Gómez, Donato A. Grasso, Sarah Groc, Brian Heterick, Benjamin D. Hoffmann, Lori Lach, John Lattke, Maurice Leponce, Jean-Philippe Lessard, John Longino, Andrea Lucky, Jonathan Majer, Sean B. Menke, Dirk Mezger, Alessandra Mori, Thinandavha C. Munyai, Omid Paknia, Jessica Pearce-Duvet, Martin Pfeiffer, Stacy M. Philpott, Jorge L. P. de Souza, Melanie Tista, Heraldo L. Vasconcelos, Merav Vonshak, Catherine L. Parr

Abstract

Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction among temperature, precipitation and disturbance shaped species richness and evenness. The effect was manifested through a failure of species richness to increase substantially with temperature in transformed habitats at low precipitation. At low precipitation levels, evenness increased with temperature in undisturbed sites, peaked at medium temperatures in disturbed sites and remained low in transformed sites. In warmer climates with lower rainfall, the effects of increasing disturbance on species richness and evenness were akin to decreases in temperature of up to 9°C. Anthropogenic disturbance and ongoing climate change may interact in complicated ways to shape the structure of assemblages, with hot, arid environments likely to be at greatest risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 7 3%
France 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
French Guiana 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 204 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 24%
Student > Master 37 17%
Researcher 28 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 7%
Student > Bachelor 13 6%
Other 53 24%
Unknown 22 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 129 58%
Environmental Science 42 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Computer Science 3 1%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 31 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2020.
All research outputs
#1,372,500
of 17,833,983 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3,290
of 8,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,430
of 241,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#66
of 170 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,833,983 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,827 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,695 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 170 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.