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Female hatchling American kestrels have a larger hippocampus than males: A link with sexual size dimorphism?

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioural Brain Research, September 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Female hatchling American kestrels have a larger hippocampus than males: A link with sexual size dimorphism?
Published in
Behavioural Brain Research, September 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.bbr.2018.04.037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mélanie F. Guigueno, Natalie K. Karouna-Renier, Paula F.P. Henry, Jessica A. Head, Lisa E. Peters, Vince P. Palace, Robert J. Letcher, Kim J. Fernie

Abstract

The brain and underlying cognition may vary adaptively according to an organism's ecology. As with all raptor species, adult American kestrels (Falco sparverius) are sexually dimorphic with females being larger than males. Related to this sexual dimorphism, kestrels display sex differences in hunting and migration, with females ranging more widely than males, suggesting possible sex differences in spatial cognition. However, hippocampus volume, the brain region responsible for spatial cognition, has not been investigated in raptors. Here, we measured hippocampus and telencephalon volumes in American kestrel hatchlings and found no significant difference between left and right hemispheres for either hippocampus or telencephalon. Female hatchlings had a significantly larger hippocampus relative to the telencephalon and brain weight than males (~12% larger), although telencephalon volume relative to brain weight and body size was similar between the sexes. The magnitude of this hippocampal sex difference is similar to that reported between male and female polygynous Microtus voles and subspecies of Zonotrichia sparrows. Future research should determine if this sex difference in relative hippocampus volume of hatchling kestrels persists into adulthood and if similar patterns exist in other raptor species, thus potentially linking sex differences in the brain to sex differences of space use of adults in the wild.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 38%
Researcher 3 23%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Librarian 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 54%
Social Sciences 3 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Arts and Humanities 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2018.
All research outputs
#6,625,353
of 12,991,172 outputs
Outputs from Behavioural Brain Research
#1,533
of 3,367 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,303
of 268,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioural Brain Research
#10
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,991,172 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,367 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.