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A brain-machine interface instructed by direct intracortical microstimulation

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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128 Dimensions

Readers on

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250 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
A brain-machine interface instructed by direct intracortical microstimulation
Published in
Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, January 2009
DOI 10.3389/neuro.07.020.2009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph E. O'Doherty

Abstract

Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) establish direct communication between the brain and artificial actuators. As such, they hold considerable promise for restoring mobility and communication in patients suffering from severe body paralysis. To achieve this end, future BMIs must also provide a means for delivering sensory signals from the actuators back to the brain. Prosthetic sensation is needed so that neuroprostheses can be better perceived and controlled. Here we show that a direct intracortical input can be added to a BMI to instruct rhesus monkeys in choosing the direction of reaching movements generated by the BMI. Somatosensory instructions were provided to two monkeys operating the BMI using either: (a) vibrotactile stimulation of the monkey's hands or (b) multi-channel intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) delivered to the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in one monkey and posterior parietal cortex (PP) in the other. Stimulus delivery was contingent on the position of the computer cursor: the monkey placed it in the center of the screen to receive machine-brain recursive input. After 2 weeks of training, the same level of proficiency in utilizing somatosensory information was achieved with ICMS of S1 as with the stimulus delivered to the hand skin. ICMS of PP was not effective. These results indicate that direct, bi-directional communication between the brain and neuroprosthetic devices can be achieved through the combination of chronic multi-electrode recording and microstimulation of S1. We propose that in the future, bidirectional BMIs incorporating ICMS may become an effective paradigm for sensorizing neuroprosthetic devices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 250 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 18 7%
Germany 4 2%
Sweden 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 216 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 28%
Researcher 54 22%
Student > Bachelor 23 9%
Student > Master 23 9%
Professor 17 7%
Other 53 21%
Unknown 9 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 76 30%
Engineering 65 26%
Neuroscience 34 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 7%
Psychology 13 5%
Other 29 12%
Unknown 15 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2018.
All research outputs
#917,477
of 13,617,860 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
#51
of 582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,237
of 98,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,617,860 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,009 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them