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Vulnerability of native savanna trees and exoticKhaya senegalensisto seasonal drought

Overview of attention for article published in Tree Physiology, May 2015
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Title
Vulnerability of native savanna trees and exoticKhaya senegalensisto seasonal drought
Published in
Tree Physiology, May 2015
DOI 10.1093/treephys/tpv037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefan K. Arndt, Gregor J. Sanders, Mila Bristow, Lindsay B. Hutley, Jason Beringer, Stephen J. Livesley

Abstract

Seasonally dry ecosystems present a challenge to plants to maintain water relations. While native vegetation in seasonally dry ecosystems have evolved specific adaptations to the long dry season, there are risks to introduced exotic species. African mahogany, Khaya senegalensis Desr. (A. Juss.), is an exotic plantation species that has been introduced widely in Asia and northern Australia, but it is unknown if it has the physiological or phenotypic plasticity to cope with the strongly seasonal patterns of water availability in the tropical savanna climate of northern Australia. We investigated the gas exchange and water relations traits and adjustments to seasonal drought in K. senegalensis and native eucalypts (Eucalyptus tetrodonta F. Muell. and Corymbia latifolia F. Muell.) in a savanna ecosystem in northern Australia. The native eucalypts did not exhibit any signs of drought stress after 3 months of no rainfall and probably had access to deeper soil moisture late into the dry season. Leaf water potential, stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthesis all remained high in the dry season but osmotic adjustment was not observed. Overstorey leaf area index (LAI) was 0.6 in the native eucalypt savanna and did not change between wet and dry seasons. In contrast, the K. senegalensis plantation in the wet season was characterized by a high water potential, high stomatal conductance and transpiration and a high LAI of 2.4. In the dry season, K. senegalensis experienced mild drought stress with a predawn water potential -0.6 MPa. Overstorey LAI was halved, and stomatal conductance and transpiration drastically reduced, while minimum leaf water potentials did not change (-2 MPa) and no osmotic adjustment occurred. Khaya senegalensis exhibited an isohydric behaviour and also had a lower hydraulic vulnerability to cavitation in leaves, with a P50 of -2.3 MPa. The native eucalypts had twice the maximum leaf hydraulic conductance but a much higher P50 of -1.5 MPa. Khaya senegalensis has evolved in a wet-dry tropical climate in West Africa (600-800 mm) and appears to be well suited to the seasonal savanna climate of northern Australia. The species exhibited a large phenotypic plasticity through leaf area adjustments and conservative isohydric behaviour in the 6 months dry season while operating well above its critical hydraulic threshold.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Professor 3 8%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 43%
Environmental Science 7 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 8%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 7 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2015.
All research outputs
#9,619,914
of 12,023,743 outputs
Outputs from Tree Physiology
#461
of 817 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,301
of 229,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tree Physiology
#14
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,023,743 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 817 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.