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Calcium sensors of ciliary outer arm dynein: functions and phylogenetic considerations for eukaryotic evolution

Overview of attention for article published in Cilia, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Calcium sensors of ciliary outer arm dynein: functions and phylogenetic considerations for eukaryotic evolution
Published in
Cilia, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13630-015-0015-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazuo Inaba

Abstract

The motility of eukaryotic cilia and flagella is modulated in response to several extracellular stimuli. Ca(2+) is the most critical intracellular factor for these changes in motility, directly acting on the axonemes and altering flagellar asymmetry. Calaxin is an opisthokont-specific neuronal calcium sensor protein first described in the sperm of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. It binds to a heavy chain of two-headed outer arm dynein in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and regulates 'asymmetric' wave propagation at high concentrations of Ca(2+). A Ca(2+)-binding subunit of outer arm dynein in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the light chain 4 (LC4), which is a Ca(2+)-sensor phylogenetically different from calaxin, shows Ca(2+)-dependent binding to a heavy chain of three-headed outer arm dynein. However, LC4 appears to participate in 'symmetric' wave propagation at high concentrations of Ca(2+). LC4-type dynein light chain is present in bikonts, except for some subclasses of the Excavata. Thus, flagellar asymmetry-symmetry conversion in response to Ca(2+) concentration represents a 'mirror image' relationship between Ciona and Chlamydomonas. Phylogenetic analyses indicate the duplication, divergence, and loss of heavy chain and Ca(2+)-sensors of outer arm dynein among excavate species. These features imply a divergence point with respect to Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of outer arm dynein in cilia and flagella during the evolution of eukaryotic supergroups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Norway 1 2%
Unknown 40 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 23%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Engineering 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2015.
All research outputs
#7,410,488
of 13,860,865 outputs
Outputs from Cilia
#40
of 85 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,760
of 233,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cilia
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,860,865 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,044 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them