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Nicotine pre-exposure reduces stroke-induced glucose transporter-1 activity at the blood–brain barrier in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, April 2015
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Title
Nicotine pre-exposure reduces stroke-induced glucose transporter-1 activity at the blood–brain barrier in mice
Published in
Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12987-015-0005-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaushik K Shah, Purushotham Reddy Boreddy, Thomas J Abbruscato

Abstract

With growing electronic cigarette usage in both the smoking and nonsmoking population, rigorous studies are needed to investigate the effects of nicotine on biological systems to determine long-term health consequences. We have previously shown that nicotine exerts specific neurovascular effects that influence blood brain barrier (BBB) function in response to stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of nicotine on carrier-mediated glucose transport into ischemic brain. Specifically, the present study investigates glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) function and expression at the BBB in a focal brain ischemia model of mice pre-exposed to nicotine. Nicotine was administrated subcutaneously by osmotic pump at the dose of 4.5 mg/kg/day for 1, 7, or 14 days to reflect the plasma levels seen in smokers. Ischemic-reperfusion (IR) injury was induced by 1 h transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and 24 h reperfusion. Glucose transport was estimated using an in situ brain perfusion technique with radiolabeled glucose and brain vascular GLUT1 expression was detected with immunofluorescence. The nicotine pre-exposure (1, 7 & 14 day) resulted in significant reduction in D-glucose influx rate (K in ) across the BBB, with a 49% reduction in 14 day nicotine-infused animals. We observed a 41% increase in carrier-mediated glucose transport across the BBB in saline-infused tMCAO animals compared to saline-infused sham animals. Interestingly, in the tMCAO group of animals pre-exposed to nicotine for 14 days had significantly attenuated increased glucose transport by 80% and 38% compared to saline-infused tMCAO and sham animals respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies of GLUT1 protein expression in the brain microvascular endothelium confirmed that GLUT1 was also induced in saline-infused tMCAO animals and this protein expression induction was reduced significantly (P < 0.01) with 14 day nicotine pre-exposure in tMCAO animals. Nicotine pre-exposure reduced the IR-enhanced GLUT1 transporter function and expression at the BBB in a focal brain ischemia mouse model. These studies suggest that nicotine exposure prior to stroke could create an enhanced glucose deprived state at the neurovascular unit (NVU) and could provide an additional vulnerability to enhanced stroke injury.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Professor 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 23%
Environmental Science 3 12%
Unspecified 3 12%
Psychology 3 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Other 9 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,662,954
of 5,045,006 outputs
Outputs from Fluids and Barriers of the CNS
#35
of 82 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,848
of 168,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fluids and Barriers of the CNS
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,045,006 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 168,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.