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Identification and functional characterization of the CYP51 gene from the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous that is involved in ergosterol biosynthesis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, April 2015
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Title
Identification and functional characterization of the CYP51 gene from the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous that is involved in ergosterol biosynthesis
Published in
BMC Microbiology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0428-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kritsye Leiva, Nicole Werner, Dionisia Sepúlveda, Salvador Barahona, Marcelo Baeza, Víctor Cifuentes, Jennifer Alcaíno

Abstract

Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a basidiomycetous yeast that synthesizes astaxanthin, a carotenoid with great biotechnological impact. The ergosterol and carotenoid synthetic pathways derive from the mevalonate pathway and involve cytochrome P450 enzymes. Among these enzymes, the CYP51 family, which is involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, is one of the most remarkable that has C14-demethylase activity. In this study, the CYP51 gene from X. dendrorhous was isolated and its function was analyzed. The gene is composed of ten exons and encodes a predicted 550 amino acid polypeptide that exhibits conserved cytochrome P450 structural characteristics and shares significant identity with the sterol C14-demethylase from other fungi. The functionality of this gene was confirmed by heterologous complementation in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, a CYP51 gene mutation in X. dendrorhous reduced sterol production by approximately 40% and enhanced total carotenoid production by approximately 90% compared to the wild-type strain after 48 and 120 h of culture, respectively. Additionally, the CYP51 gene mutation in X. dendrorhous increased HMGR (hydroxy-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, involved in the mevalonate pathway) and crtR (cytochrome P450 reductase) transcript levels, which could be associated with reduced ergosterol production. These results suggest that the CYP51 gene identified in X. dendrorhous encodes a functional sterol C14-demethylase that is involved in ergosterol biosynthesis.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 31 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 30%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 27%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2015.
All research outputs
#4,208,990
of 5,035,310 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#829
of 1,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,696
of 169,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#30
of 32 outputs
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