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3.3-million-year-old stone tools from Lomekwi 3, West Turkana, Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
75 news outlets
blogs
24 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
690 tweeters
facebook
47 Facebook pages
wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
43 Google+ users
reddit
7 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
340 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
3.3-million-year-old stone tools from Lomekwi 3, West Turkana, Kenya
Published in
Nature, May 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature14464
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sonia Harmand, Jason E. Lewis, Craig S. Feibel, Christopher J. Lepre, Sandrine Prat, Arnaud Lenoble, Xavier Boës, Rhonda L. Quinn, Michel Brenet, Adrian Arroyo, Nicholas Taylor, Sophie Clément, Guillaume Daver, Jean-Philip Brugal, Louise Leakey, Richard A. Mortlock, James D. Wright, Sammy Lokorodi, Christopher Kirwa, Dennis V. Kent, Hélène Roche, Harmand, Sonia, Lewis, Jason E, Feibel, Craig S, Lepre, Christopher J, Prat, Sandrine, Lenoble, Arnaud, Boës, Xavier, Quinn, Rhonda L, Brenet, Michel, Arroyo, Adrian, Taylor, Nicholas, Clément, Sophie, Daver, Guillaume, Brugal, Jean-Philip, Leakey, Louise, Mortlock, Richard A, Wright, James D, Lokorodi, Sammy, Kirwa, Christopher, Kent, Dennis V, Roche, Hélène

Abstract

Human evolutionary scholars have long supposed that the earliest stone tools were made by the genus Homo and that this technological development was directly linked to climate change and the spread of savannah grasslands. New fieldwork in West Turkana, Kenya, has identified evidence of much earlier hominin technological behaviour. We report the discovery of Lomekwi 3, a 3.3-million-year-old archaeological site where in situ stone artefacts occur in spatiotemporal association with Pliocene hominin fossils in a wooded palaeoenvironment. The Lomekwi 3 knappers, with a developing understanding of stone's fracture properties, combined core reduction with battering activities. Given the implications of the Lomekwi 3 assemblage for models aiming to converge environmental change, hominin evolution and technological origins, we propose for it the name 'Lomekwian', which predates the Oldowan by 700,000 years and marks a new beginning to the known archaeological record.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 690 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 340 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 7 2%
Italy 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 316 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 90 26%
Researcher 51 15%
Student > Bachelor 42 12%
Student > Master 38 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 21 6%
Other 81 24%
Unknown 17 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 86 25%
Arts and Humanities 78 23%
Social Sciences 59 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 34 10%
Psychology 10 3%
Other 56 16%
Unknown 17 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1383. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2017.
All research outputs
#741
of 7,916,730 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#184
of 46,697 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29
of 217,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#10
of 1,002 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,916,730 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 46,697 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 72.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,002 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.