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Medical Students' Death Anxiety: Severity and Association With Psychological Health and Attitudes Toward Palliative Care

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pain & Symptom Management, September 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
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Title
Medical Students' Death Anxiety: Severity and Association With Psychological Health and Attitudes Toward Palliative Care
Published in
Journal of Pain & Symptom Management, September 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.03.014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pia Thiemann, Thelma Quince, John Benson, Diana Wood, Stephen Barclay

Abstract

Death anxiety is related to awareness of the reality of dying and death and can be negatively related to a person's psychological health. Physicians' death anxiety also may influence their care for patients approaching death. Doctors face death in a professional context for the first time at medical school, but knowledge about death anxiety among medical students is limited. To examine medical students' death anxiety in relation to: 1) its severity, gender differences and trajectory during medical education, and 2) its associations with students' attitudes towards palliative care and their psychological health. Four cohorts of core science and four cohorts of clinical students at the University of Cambridge Medical School took part in a questionnaire survey with longitudinal follow-up. Students who provided data on the revised Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale were included in the analysis (N=790). Medical students' death anxiety was moderate, with no gender differences and remained very stable over time. High death anxiety was associated with higher depression and anxiety levels and greater concerns about the personal impact of providing palliative care. The associations between high death anxiety and lower psychological health and negative attitudes towards palliative care are concerning. It is important to address death anxiety during medical education in order to enhance student's psychological health and the quality of their future palliative care provision.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Hong Kong 1 1%
Singapore 1 1%
Unknown 88 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Postgraduate 10 11%
Other 28 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 39%
Psychology 20 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 17%
Unspecified 13 14%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2015.
All research outputs
#6,451,652
of 12,301,408 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pain & Symptom Management
#1,316
of 2,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,706
of 234,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pain & Symptom Management
#19
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,301,408 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,065 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,816 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.