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Support for midlife anxiety diagnosis as an independent risk factor for dementia: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 14,030)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
85 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
61 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Support for midlife anxiety diagnosis as an independent risk factor for dementia: a systematic review
Published in
BMJ Open, April 2018
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019399
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy Gimson, Marco Schlosser, Jonathan D Huntley, Natalie L Marchant

Abstract

Anxiety is an increasingly recognised predictor of cognitive deterioration in older adults and in those with mild cognitive impairment. Often believed to be a prodromal feature of neurodegenerative disease, anxiety may also be an independent risk factor for dementia, operationally defined here as preceding dementia diagnosis by ≥10 years. A systematic review of the literature on anxiety diagnosis and long-term risk for dementia was performed following published guidelines. Medline, PsycINFO and Embase were searched for peer-reviewed journals until 8 March 2017. Publications reporting HR/OR for all-cause dementia based on clinical criteria from prospective cohort or case-control studies were selected. Included studies measured clinically significant anxiety in isolation or after controlling for symptoms of depression, and reported a mean interval between anxiety assessment and dementia diagnosis of at least 10 years. Methodological quality assessments were performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. HR/OR for all-cause dementia. Searches yielded 3510 articles, of which 4 (0.02%) were eligible. The studies had a combined sample size of 29 819, and all studies found a positive association between clinically significant anxiety and future dementia. Due to the heterogeneity between studies, a meta-analysis was not conducted. Clinically significant anxiety in midlife was associated with an increased risk of dementia over an interval of at least 10 years. These findings indicate that anxiety may be a risk factor for late-life dementia, excluding anxiety that is related to prodromal cognitive decline. With increasing focus on identifying modifiable risk factors for dementia, more high-quality prospective studies are required to clarify whether clinical anxiety is a risk factor for dementia, separate from a prodromal symptom.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 17%
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 18%
Psychology 14 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 22 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 732. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2020.
All research outputs
#10,778
of 15,482,859 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#37
of 14,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#456
of 277,669 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#3
of 615 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,482,859 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,030 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,669 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 615 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.