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Evolution of ascariasis in humans and pigs: a multi-disciplinary approach

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, January 2003
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1 tweeter

Citations

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39 Dimensions

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102 Mendeley
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Title
Evolution of ascariasis in humans and pigs: a multi-disciplinary approach
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, January 2003
DOI 10.1590/s0074-02762003000900008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Odile Loreille, Françoise Bouchet

Abstract

The nematode parasite Ascaris lumbricoides infects the digestive tracts of over 1.4 billion people worldwide, and its sister species, Ascaris suum, has infected a countless number of domesticated and feral pigs. It is generally thought that the putative ancestor to these worms infected either humans or pigs, but with the advent of domestication, they had ample opportunity to jump to a new host and subsequently specialize and evolve into a new species. While nuclear DNA makers decisively separate the two populations, mitochondrial sequences reveal that three major haplotypes are found in A. suum and in A. lumbricoides, indicating either occasional hybridization, causing introgression of gene trees, or retention of polymorphism dating back to the original ancestral species. This article provides an illustration of the combined contribution of parasitology, archaeoparasitology, genetics and paleogenetics to the history of ascariasis. We specifically investigate the molecular history of ascariasis in humans by sequencing DNA from the eggs of Ascaris found among ancient archeological remains. The findings of this paleogenetic survey will explain whether the three mitochondrial haplotypes result from recent hybridization and introgression, due to intensive human-pig interaction, or whether their co-occurrence predates pig husbandry, perhaps dating back to the common ancestor. We hope to show how human-pig interaction has shaped the recent evolutionary history of this disease, perhaps revealing the identify of the ancestral host.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 4%
France 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 91 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 16%
Student > Master 15 15%
Researcher 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 21 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 7%
Environmental Science 6 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 21 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,669,150
of 5,026,176 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#159
of 260 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,333
of 169,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,026,176 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 260 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 169,662 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them