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Effects of Morphine and Midazolam on Pharyngeal Function, Airway Protection, and Coordination of Breathing and Swallowing in Healthy Adults

Overview of attention for article published in Anesthesiology, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

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52 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Morphine and Midazolam on Pharyngeal Function, Airway Protection, and Coordination of Breathing and Swallowing in Healthy Adults
Published in
Anesthesiology, June 2015
DOI 10.1097/aln.0000000000000657
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna I. Hårdemark Cedborg, Eva Sundman, Katarina Bodén, Hanne Witt Hedström, Richard Kuylenstierna, Olle Ekberg, Lars I. Eriksson

Abstract

Drugs used for sedation in anesthesia and intensive care may cause pharyngeal dysfunction and increased risk for aspiration. In this study, the authors investigate the impact of sedative doses of morphine and midazolam on pharyngeal function during swallowing and coordination of breathing and swallowing. Pharyngeal function, coordination of breathing and swallowing, and level of sedation were assessed by manometry, videoradiography, measurements of respiratory airflow, and a visual analog scale in 32 healthy volunteers (age 19 to 35 yr). After baseline recordings, morphine (0.1 mg/kg) or midazolam (0.05 mg/kg) was administered intravenously for 20 min, followed by recordings at 10 and 30 min after the end of infusion. Pharyngeal dysfunction, seen as misdirected or incomplete swallowing or penetration of bolus to the airway, increased after morphine infusion to 42 and 44% of swallows compared with 17% in baseline recordings. Midazolam markedly increased incidence of pharyngeal dysfunction from 16 to 48% and 59%. Morphine prolonged apnea before swallowing, and midazolam increased the number of swallows followed by inspiration. Morphine and midazolam in dosages that produce sedation are associated with increased incidence of pharyngeal dysfunction and discoordinated breathing and swallowing, a combination impairing airway protection and potentially increasing the risk for pulmonary aspirations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Unspecified 2 13%
Lecturer 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 40%
Unspecified 3 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2019.
All research outputs
#477,763
of 13,444,619 outputs
Outputs from Anesthesiology
#158
of 4,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,763
of 232,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Anesthesiology
#1
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,444,619 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,942 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,450 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.