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Distinct Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses Exist in Different Soil Types

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Distinct Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses Exist in Different Soil Types
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, June 2015
DOI 10.1128/aem.03878-14
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian Reavy, Maud M. Swanson, Peter J. A. Cock, Lorna Dawson, Thomas E. Freitag, Brajesh K. Singh, Lesley Torrance, Arcady R. Mushegian, Michael Taliansky

Abstract

Potential dependence of virus populations on soil types was examined by electron microscopy and the total abundance of virus particles in four soil types was similar to that previously observed in soil samples. Four soil types examined differed in the relative abundances of four morphological groups of viruses. Machair, a unique type of coastal soil in western Scotland and Ireland, differed from others tested in having a higher proportion of tailed bacteriophages. The other soils examined contained predominantly spherical and thin filamentous virus particles but the Machair soil had more even distribution of the virus types. As the first step to look at differences in populations in detail virus sequences from Machair and brown earth (agricultural pasture) soils were examined by metagenomic sequencing after enriching for circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) virus genomes. Sequences from the Microviridae family (icosahedral viruses mainly infecting bacteria) of CRESS-DNA viruses were predominant in both soils. Phylogenetic analysis of Microviridae major coat protein sequences from the Machair viruses showed that they spanned most of the diversity of the subfamily Gokushovirinae, which mainly infect obligate intracellular parasites. The brown earth soil had a higher proportion of sequences that matched in BLAST searches the morphologically similar Circoviridae family. However, analysis of putative replicase proteins that were similar to those of viruses in the Circoviridae showed that they are a novel clade of Circoviridae-related CRESS-DNA viruses distinct from known Circoviridae genera. Different soils have substantially different taxonomic biodiversity even within ssDNA viruses which may be driven by physicochemical factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
Germany 1 1%
France 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 71 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 32%
Student > Master 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Student > Postgraduate 3 4%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 3 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 21%
Environmental Science 8 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 9%
Physics and Astronomy 2 3%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2016.
All research outputs
#10,829,746
of 19,163,209 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#13,090
of 16,241 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,765
of 244,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#70
of 159 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,163,209 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,241 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 159 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.