↓ Skip to main content

Organoleptic and glycemic properties of chickpea-wheat composite breads

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Food Science and Technology, October 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Organoleptic and glycemic properties of chickpea-wheat composite breads
Published in
Journal of Food Science and Technology, October 2013
DOI 10.1007/s13197-013-1192-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tasleem A. Zafar, Fatima Al-Hassawi, Fatima Al-Khulaifi, Ghanima Al-Rayyes, Carol Waslien, Fatma G. Huffman

Abstract

Prevalence of obesity and type-2-diabetes requires dietary manipulation. It was hypothesized that wheat-legume-composite breads will reduce the spike of blood glucose and increase satiety. Four pan bread samples were prepared: White bread (WB) as standard, Whole-wheat bread (WWB), WWB supplemented with chickpea flour at 25 % (25%ChB) and 35 % (35%ChB) levels. These breads were tested in healthy female subjects for acceptability and for effect on appetite, blood glucose, and physical discomfort in digestion. The breads were rated >5.6 on a 9-point hedonic scale with WB significantly higher than all other breads. No difference in area under the curve (AUC) for appetite was found, but blood glucose AUC was reduced as follows: 35%ChB < WB and WWB, WB >25%ChB = WWB or 35%ChB. We conclude that addition of chickpea flour at 35 % to whole wheat produces a bread that is acceptable to eat, causing no physical discomfort and lowers the glycemic response.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Unspecified 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 47%
Engineering 2 13%
Unspecified 2 13%
Physics and Astronomy 1 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2015.
All research outputs
#9,975,609
of 12,461,407 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Food Science and Technology
#421
of 765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,323
of 231,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Food Science and Technology
#27
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,461,407 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 765 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,114 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.