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The role of emotions in time to presentation for symptoms suggestive of cancer: a systematic literature review of quantitative studies

Overview of attention for article published in Psycho-Oncology, May 2015
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2 tweeters

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Title
The role of emotions in time to presentation for symptoms suggestive of cancer: a systematic literature review of quantitative studies
Published in
Psycho-Oncology, May 2015
DOI 10.1002/pon.3833
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chantal Balasooriya-Smeekens, Fiona M. Walter, Suzanne Scott

Abstract

Emotions may be important in patients' decisions to seek medical help for symptoms suggestive of cancer. The aim of this systematic literature review was to examine quantitative literature on the influence of emotion on patients' help-seeking for symptoms suggestive of cancer. The objectives were to identify the following: (a) which types of emotions influence help-seeking behaviour, (b) whether these form a barrier or trigger for seeking medical help and (c) how the role of emotions varies between different cancers and populations. We searched four electronic databases and conducted a narrative synthesis. Inclusion criteria were studies that reported primary, quantitative research that examined any emotion specific to symptom appraisal or help-seeking for symptoms suggestive of cancer. Thirty-three papers were included. The studies were heterogeneous in their methods and quality, and very few had emotion as the main focus of the research. Studies reported a limited range of emotions, mainly related to fear and worry. The impact of emotions appears mixed, sometimes acting as a barrier to consultation whilst at other times being a trigger or being unrelated to time to presentation. It is plausible that different emotions play different roles at different times prior to presentation. This systematic review provides some quantitative evidence for the role of emotions in help-seeking behaviour. However, it also highlighted widespread methodological, definition and design issues among the existing literature. The conflicting results around the role of emotions on time to presentation may be due to the lack of definition of each specific emotion. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Unspecified 4 12%
Other 4 12%
Student > Master 4 12%
Other 11 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 10 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 27%
Psychology 7 21%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2015.
All research outputs
#9,355,574
of 12,189,224 outputs
Outputs from Psycho-Oncology
#1,200
of 1,519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,056
of 231,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psycho-Oncology
#53
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,189,224 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,519 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.