↓ Skip to main content

Modelling the relationship between obesity and mental health in children and adolescents: findings from the Health Survey for England 2007

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, October 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Modelling the relationship between obesity and mental health in children and adolescents: findings from the Health Survey for England 2007
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, October 2011
DOI 10.1186/1753-2000-5-31
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul A Tiffin, Bronia Arnott, Helen J Moore, Carolyn D Summerbell

Abstract

A number of studies have reported significant associations between obesity and poor psychological wellbeing in children but findings have been inconsistent. Methods: This study utilised data from 3,898 children aged 5-16 years obtained from the Health Survey for England 2007. Information was available on Body Mass Index (BMI), parental ratings of child emotional and behavioural health (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), self-reported physical activity levels and sociodemographic variables. A multilevel modelling approach was used to allow for the clustering of children within households. Results: Curvilinear relationships between both internalising (emotional) and externalising (behavioural) symptoms and adjusted BMI were observed. After adjusting for potential confounders the relationships between obesity and psychological adjustment (reported externalising and internalising symptoms) remained statistically significant. Being overweight, rather than obese, had no impact on overall reported mental health. 17% of children with obesity were above the suggested screening threshold for emotional problems, compared to 9% of non-obese children. Allowing for clustering and potential confounding variables children classified as obese had an odds ratio (OR) of 2.13 (95% CI 1.39 to 3.26) for being above the screening threshold for an emotional disorder compared to non-obese young people. No cross-level interactions between household income and the relationships between obesity and internalising or externalising symptoms were observed. Conclusions: In this large, representative, UK-based community sample a curvilinear association with emotional wellbeing was observed for adjusted BMI suggesting the possibility of a threshold effect. Further research could focus on exploring causal relationships and developing targeted interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Canada 1 1%
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 93 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 15%
Student > Master 15 15%
Researcher 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 11 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 25%
Social Sciences 15 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 19 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,540,464
of 13,693,516 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#168
of 456 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,568
of 98,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,693,516 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 456 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,376 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them