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Associations between Urban Sprawl and Life Expectancy in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
73 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
Associations between Urban Sprawl and Life Expectancy in the United States
Published in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15050861
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shima Hamidi, Reid Ewing, Zaria Tatalovich, James Grace, David Berrigan

Abstract

In recent years, the United States has had a relatively poor performance with respect to life expectancy compared to the other developed nations. Urban sprawl is one of the potential causes of the high rate of mortality in the United States. This study investigated cross-sectional associations between sprawl and life expectancy for metropolitan counties in the United States in 2010. In this study, the measure of life expectancy in 2010 came from a recently released dataset of life expectancies by county. This study modeled average life expectancy with a structural equation model that included five mediators: annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT) per household, average body mass index, crime rate, and air quality index as mediators of sprawl, as well as percentage of smokers as a mediator of socioeconomic status. After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, this study found that life expectancy was significantly higher in compact counties than in sprawling counties. Compactness affects mortality directly, but the causal mechanism is unclear. For example, it may be that sprawling areas have higher traffic speeds and longer emergency response times, lower quality and less accessible health care facilities, or less availability of healthy foods. Compactness affects mortality indirectly through vehicle miles traveled, which is a contributor to traffic fatalities, and through body mass index, which is a contributor to many chronic diseases. This study identified significant direct and indirect associations between urban sprawl and life expectancy. These findings support further research and practice aimed at identifying and implementing changes to urban planning designed to support health and healthy behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 73 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Unspecified 10 9%
Researcher 8 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 7%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 39 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 13 12%
Unspecified 10 9%
Environmental Science 7 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 6%
Psychology 5 5%
Other 26 24%
Unknown 41 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 119. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2022.
All research outputs
#272,219
of 21,798,458 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
#349
of 23,643 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,055
of 297,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
#7
of 338 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,798,458 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 23,643 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,645 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 338 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.