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Cortical burst dynamics predict clinical outcome early in extremely preterm infants

Overview of attention for article published in Brain: A Journal of Neurology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
35 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
67 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Cortical burst dynamics predict clinical outcome early in extremely preterm infants
Published in
Brain: A Journal of Neurology, May 2015
DOI 10.1093/brain/awv129
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kartik K. Iyer, James A. Roberts, Lena Hellström-Westas, Sverre Wikström, Ingrid Hansen Pupp, David Ley, Sampsa Vanhatalo, Michael Breakspear

Abstract

Intermittent bursts of electrical activity are a ubiquitous signature of very early brain activity. Previous studies have largely focused on assessing the amplitudes of these transient cortical bursts or the intervals between them. Recent advances in basic neuroscience have identified the presence of scale-free 'avalanche' processes in bursting patterns of cortical activity in other clinical contexts. Here, we hypothesize that cortical bursts in human preterm infants also exhibit scale-free properties, providing new insights into the nature, temporal evolution, and prognostic value of spontaneous brain activity in the days immediately following preterm birth. We examined electroencephalographic recordings from 43 extremely preterm infants (gestational age 22-28 weeks) and demonstrated that their cortical bursts exhibit scale-free properties as early as 12 h after birth. The scaling relationships of cortical bursts correlate significantly with later mental development-particularly within the first 12 h of life. These findings show that early preterm brain activity is characterized by scale-free dynamics which carry developmental significance, hence offering novel means for rapid and early clinical prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Finland 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 61 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Student > Master 10 15%
Unspecified 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 18 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 13 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Unspecified 10 15%
Engineering 7 10%
Other 14 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 77. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2018.
All research outputs
#189,670
of 12,505,877 outputs
Outputs from Brain: A Journal of Neurology
#175
of 4,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,533
of 233,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain: A Journal of Neurology
#8
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,505,877 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,861 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.