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A randomized, home-based, childhood obesity intervention delivered by patient navigators

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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185 Mendeley
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Title
A randomized, home-based, childhood obesity intervention delivered by patient navigators
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1833-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lourdes Yun, Richard E. Boles, Matthew A. Haemer, Shanna Knierim, L. Miriam Dickinson, Heather Mancinas, Simon J. Hambidge, Arthur J. Davidson

Abstract

Although Colorado is perceived as a healthy state, in 2010, 14.1 % of children aged 2-5 were overweight and 9.1 % were obese. Despite the high prevalence of obesity in this population, evidence to support particular strategies to treat obese preschoolers is lacking. The efficacy of home-based, childhood obesity interventions to reduce a child's body mass index is inconclusive. However, this model uniquely provides an opportunity to observe and intervene with the home food and activity environment and engage the entire family in promoting changes that fit each family's unique dynamics. Eligible participants are children aged 2-5 years who attended a well-child care visit at a Denver Health Community Health Service clinic within 12 months prior to recruitment and on that visit had a body mass index (BMI) >85th percentile-for-age. Participants are randomly recruited at study inception and allocated to the intervention in one of five defined 6-month stepped wedge engagements; the delayed intervention groups serves as control groups until the start of the intervention. The program is delivered by a patient navigator at the family' home and consists of a 16-session curriculum focused on 1) parenting styles, 2) nutrition, and 3) physical activity. At each visit, a portion of curriculum is delivered to guide parents and children in selecting one goal for behavior change in each of three work areas to work on during the following week. The primary study outcome measure is change in BMI z-score from baseline to post-intervention period. This childhood obesity study, innovative for its home-based intervention venue, provides rich data characterizing barriers and facilitators to healthy behavior change within the home. The study population is innovative as it is focused on preschool-aged, Latino children from low-income families; this population has not typically been targeted in obesity management assessments. The home-based intervention is linked to clinical care through update letters and assessment of the program's impact to the child's medical providers. Informing primary care providers about a child's accomplishments and challenges, allows the clinician to support the health weight effort when seeing families during subsequent clinical visits. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02024360 Registered December 21, 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 185 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 181 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 19%
Student > Bachelor 32 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 13%
Researcher 23 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 10%
Other 33 18%
Unknown 18 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 41 22%
Social Sciences 22 12%
Psychology 11 6%
Sports and Recreations 10 5%
Other 20 11%
Unknown 31 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2016.
All research outputs
#2,987,961
of 11,427,194 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,311
of 7,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,451
of 227,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#109
of 245 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,427,194 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,834 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,095 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 245 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.