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Two nights of sleep deprivation with or without energy restriction does not impair the thermal response to cold.

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, May 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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6 tweeters

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Two nights of sleep deprivation with or without energy restriction does not impair the thermal response to cold.
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, May 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00421-015-3184-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oliver, Samuel J, Harper Smith, Adam D, Costa, Ricardo J S, Maassen, Norbert, Bilzon, James L J, Walsh, Neil P

Abstract

In persons completing exhaustive daily exercise, sleep and energy restriction have been highlighted as risk factors for hypothermia in cold environments. The present study therefore sought to determine the effect of sleep deprivation (SDEP), with and without energy restriction, on the thermal response to cold. In a random order, ten recreationally active men (mean ± SD: age 25 ± 6 years, body fat 17 ± 5 %) completed three 53 h trials: a control (CON: 436 min/night sleep), SDEP (0 min sleep), and sleep deprivation and energy restriction (SDEP + ER: 0 min sleep and 10 % daily energy requirements). Exhaustive exercise was completed after 5 and 29 h. After 53 h participants completed a semi-nude seated cold air test (CAT, 0 °C), for 4 h or until rectal core temperature (T re) reached 36 °C. Two nights of sleep and energy restriction did not impair the thermal response to cold (T re, CON 36.15 ± 0.20 °C, SDEP 36.30 ± 0.15 °C, SDEP + ER 36.25 ± 0.20 °C, P = 0.25). Rewarming was also similar as indicated by 1 h post-CAT T re (P = 0.78). In contrast, perceived thermal discomfort during the initial hour of the CAT tended to be greater after SDEP and SDEP + ER (P ≤ 0.1). Sleep and energy restriction, at least as evaluated within this experiment, should be considered minimal risk factors for hypothermia. The greater perception of cold discomfort at the same body temperature suggests that sleep and energy restriction may actually reduce cold injury risk, as people are likely to engage earlier in normal behavioral cold adaptation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 63%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Researcher 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 4 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 25%
Environmental Science 1 13%
Computer Science 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2016.
All research outputs
#1,909,623
of 7,912,542 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#849
of 2,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,569
of 218,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#19
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,912,542 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 218,679 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.