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Neural transcriptome reveals molecular mechanisms for temporal control of vocalization across multiple timescales

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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5 CiteULike
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Title
Neural transcriptome reveals molecular mechanisms for temporal control of vocalization across multiple timescales
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1577-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ni Y Feng, Daniel J Fergus, Andrew H Bass

Abstract

Vocalization is a prominent social behavior among vertebrates, including in the midshipman fish, an established model for elucidating the neural basis of acoustic communication. Courtship vocalizations produced by territorial males are essential for reproductive success, vary over daily and seasonal cycles, and last up to hours per call. Vocalizations rely upon extreme synchrony and millisecond precision in the firing of a homogeneous population of motoneurons, the vocal motor nucleus (VMN). Although studies have identified neural mechanisms driving rapid, precise, and stable neuronal firing over long periods of calling, little is known about underlying genetic/molecular mechanisms. We used RNA sequencing-based transcriptome analyses to compare patterns of gene expression in VMN to the surrounding hindbrain across three daily and seasonal time points of high and low sound production to identify candidate genes that underlie VMN's intrinsic and network neuronal properties. Results from gene ontology enrichment, enzyme pathway mapping, and gene category-wide expression levels highlighted the importance of cellular respiration in VMN function, consistent with the high energetic demands of sustained vocal behavior. Functionally important candidate genes upregulated in the VMN, including at time points corresponding to high natural vocal activity, encode ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, hormone receptors and biosynthetic enzymes, neuromodulators, aerobic respiration enzymes, and antioxidants. Quantitative PCR and RNA-seq expression levels for 28 genes were significantly correlated. Many candidate gene products regulate mechanisms of neuronal excitability, including those previously identified in VMN motoneurons, as well as novel ones that remain to be investigated. Supporting evidence from previous studies in midshipman strongly validate the value of transcriptomic analyses for linking genes to neural characters that drive behavior. Transcriptome analyses highlighted a suite of molecular mechanisms that regulate vocalization over behaviorally relevant timescales, spanning milliseconds to hours and seasons. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive characterization of gene expression in a dedicated vocal motor nucleus. Candidate genes identified here may belong to a conserved genetic toolkit for vocal motoneurons facing similar energetic and neurophysiological demands.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 6%
United States 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 32 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 28%
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 44%
Neuroscience 6 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2015.
All research outputs
#1,016,941
of 5,160,020 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#889
of 4,689 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,453
of 172,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#66
of 258 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,160,020 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,689 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,736 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 258 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.