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The impact of completing upper secondary education - a multi-state model for work, education and health in young men

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of completing upper secondary education - a multi-state model for work, education and health in young men
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5420-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rune Hoff, Karina Corbett, Ingrid S. Mehlum, Ferdinand A. Mohn, Petter Kristensen, Therese N. Hanvold, Jon M. Gran

Abstract

Completing upper secondary education is associated with higher work participation and less health-related absence from work. Although these outcomes are closely interrelated, most studies focus on single outcomes, using cross-sectional designs or short follow-up periods. As such, there is limited knowledge of the long-term outcomes, and how paths for completers and non-completers unfold over time. In this paper, we use multi-state models for time-to-event data to assess the long-term effects of completing upper secondary education on employment, tertiary education, sick leave, and disability pension over twelve and a half years for young men. Baseline covariates and twelve and a half years of follow-up data on employment, tertiary education, sick leave and disability pension were obtained from national registries for all males born in Norway between 1971 and 1976 (n =184951). The effects of completing upper secondary education (by age 23) were analysed in a multi-state framework, adjusting for both individual and family level confounders. All analyses were done separately for general studies and vocational tracks. Completers do better on a range of outcomes compared to non-completers, for both fields of upper secondary education, but effects of completion change over time. The largest changes are for tertiary education and work, with the probability of work increasing reciprocally to the probability of education. Vocational students are quicker to transfer to the labour market, but tend to have more unemployment, sick leave and disability, and the absolute effects of completion on these outcomes are largest for vocational tracks. However, the relative effects of completion are larger for general studies. Completing upper secondary education increases long-term work participation and lowers health-related absence for young men, but effects diminish over time. Studies that have used shorter follow-up periods could be overstating the negative effects of dropout on labour market participation. Multi-state models are well suited to analyse data on work, education and health-related absence, and can be useful in understanding the dynamic aspects of these outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Researcher 3 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 12%
Student > Master 2 12%
Librarian 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 4 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 18%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 12%
Mathematics 2 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2020.
All research outputs
#1,837,564
of 16,023,308 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,195
of 11,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,382
of 279,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,023,308 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,018 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,774 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them