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Z chromosome divergence, polymorphism and relative effective population size in a genus of lekking birds

Overview of attention for article published in Heredity, May 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 news outlet
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3 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
Title
Z chromosome divergence, polymorphism and relative effective population size in a genus of lekking birds
Published in
Heredity, May 2015
DOI 10.1038/hdy.2015.46
Pubmed ID
Authors

S J Oyler-McCance, R S Cornman, K L Jones, J A Fike

Abstract

Sex chromosomes contribute disproportionately to species boundaries as they diverge faster than autosomes and often have reduced diversity. Their hemizygous nature contributes to faster divergence and reduced diversity, as do some types of selection. In birds, other factors (mating system and bottlenecks) can further decrease the effective population size of Z-linked loci and accelerate divergence (Fast-Z). We assessed Z-linked divergence and effective population sizes for two polygynous sage-grouse species and compared them to estimates from birds with various mating systems. We found lower diversity and higher FST for Z-linked loci than for autosomes, as expected. The πZ/πA ratio was 0.38 in Centrocercus minimus, 0.48 in Centrocercus urophasianus and 0.59 in a diverged, parapatric population of C. urophasianus, a broad range given the mating system among these groups is presumably equivalent. The full data set had unequal males and females across groups, so we compared an equally balanced reduced set of C. minimus and individuals pooled from both C. urophasianus subgroups recovering similar estimates: 0.54 for C. urophasianus and 0.38 for C. minimus. We provide further evidence that NeZ/NeA in birds is often lower than expected under random mating or monogamy. The lower ratio in C. minimus could be a consequence of stronger selection or drift acting on Z loci during speciation, as this species differs strongly from C. urophasianus in sexually selected characters with minimal mitochondrial divergence. As C. minimus also exhibited lower genomic diversity, it is possible that a more severe demographic history may contribute to its lower ratio.Heredity advance online publication, 27 May 2015; doi:10.1038/hdy.2015.46.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 3%
Hungary 1 3%
Sweden 1 3%
Unknown 29 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Other 8 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 75%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 16%
Unspecified 2 6%
Environmental Science 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,290,164
of 12,961,283 outputs
Outputs from Heredity
#258
of 1,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,706
of 232,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Heredity
#23
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,961,283 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,500 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,683 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.