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Self-reported fatigue following intensive care of chronically critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Intensive Care, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 446)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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48 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Self-reported fatigue following intensive care of chronically critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study
Published in
Journal of Intensive Care, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40560-018-0295-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gloria-Beatrice Wintermann, Jenny Rosendahl, Kerstin Weidner, Bernhard Strauß, Andreas Hinz, Katja Petrowski

Abstract

Protracted treatment on intensive care unit (ICU) sets the patients at increased risk for the development of chronic critical illness (CCI). Muscular and cardio-respiratory deconditioning are common long-term sequelae, going along with a state of chronic fatigue. At present, findings regarding the frequency, long-term course, and associated factors of self-reported fatigue following ICU treatment of CCI patients are lacking. CCI patients with the diagnosis of critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy (CIP/CIM) were assessed at three time points. Four weeks following the discharge from ICU at acute care hospital (t1), eligibility for study participation was asserted. Self-reported fatigue was measured using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) via telephone contact at 3 (t2, n = 113) and 6 months (t3, n = 91) following discharge from ICU at acute care hospital. At both 3 and 6 months, nearly every second CCI patient showed clinically relevant fatigue symptoms (t2/t3: n = 53/n = 51, point prevalence rates: 46.9%/45.1%). While total fatigue scores remained stable in the whole sample, female patients showed a decrease from 3 to 6 months. The presence of a coronary heart disease, the perceived fear of dying at acute care ICU, a diagnosis of major depression, and the perceived social support were confirmed as significant correlates of fatigue at 3 months. At 6 months, male gender, the number of medical comorbidities, a diagnosis of major depression, and a prior history of anxiety disorder could be identified. A negative impact of fatigue on the perceived health-related quality of life could be ascertained. Nearly every second CCI patient showed fatigue symptoms up to 6 months post-ICU. Patients at risk should be informed about fatigue, and appropriate treatment options should be offered to them. The present study was registered retrospectively at the German Clinical Trials Register (date of registration: 13th of December 2011; registration number: DRKS00003386). Date of enrolment of the first participant to the present trial: 09th of November 2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Other 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Researcher 5 8%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 18 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 22 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 24%
Psychology 3 5%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 19 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,001,661
of 19,298,685 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Intensive Care
#40
of 446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,148
of 290,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,298,685 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 446 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,871 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them