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The association between hyperandrogenemia and the metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese women

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, May 2015
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Title
The association between hyperandrogenemia and the metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese women
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13098-015-0040-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

T.G. Valderhaug, J.K. Hertel, N. Nordstrand, P.O. Dale, D. Hofsø, J. Hjelmesæth

Abstract

Female abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenemia (HA), but few studies have addressed the possible association between HA and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among obese women. Some studies indicate that insulin resistance may cause HA through different mechanisms. On the other hand, a bidirectional relationship between HA and insulin resistance has been suggested. Thus, we aimed to investigate if morbidly obese women with HA had higher odds of MetS and its components than those without HA (controls), independent of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) status. This cross-sectional study comprised 1900 consecutive treatment seeking morbidly obese women <50 years. Free testosterone index (FTI) >0.6 defined HA. Women with previously diagnosed PCOS and those with oligo- / anovulation combined with clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism were defined as having PCOS. Multiadjusted associations between HA and MetS were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Out of 1900 morbidly obese women, 1089 (57 %), 846 (45 %) and 312 (16 %) had MetS, HA and PCOS, respectively. Compared with controls (without HA), women with HA were younger (34 [1] years vs. 39 [2], p < 0.001) had a higher prevalence of MetS (62 % vs. 53 %, p < 0.001), type 2 diabetes (18 % vs. 15 %, p = 0.045), low HDL-cholesterol (65 % vs. 48 %, p < 0.001) and hypertriglyceridemia (48 % vs. 41 %, p = 0.004), but a lower prevalence of raised blood pressure (53 % vs. 59 %, p = 0.014). Multivariable analyses showed that HA was associated with increased odds of MetS (OR 1.61 [95 % CI 1.27, 2.02]), dysglycemia (1.65 [1.28, 2.11]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.58 [1.27, 1.97]), and hypertriglyceridemia (1.43 [1.15, 1.79]). After stratification for the presence of PCOS, the results remained largely unchanged in women without PCOS; MetS (1.52 [1.18, 1.96), dysglycemia (1.71 [1.30, 2.25]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.55 [1.22, 1.98]) and hypertriglyceridemia (1.36 [1.06, 1.74]). Morbidly obese women with HA had an approximately 1.5-fold increased odds of having MetS even in the absence of PCOS. Randomized controlled clinical trials, including therapeutic strategies to lower free testosterone levels, are however necessary to explore any cause-and-effect relationship.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 2 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 4 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,726,113
of 5,160,020 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#110
of 230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,039
of 173,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#8
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,160,020 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 230 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,177 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.