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Prognostic impact of CXCL16 and CXCR6 in non-small cell lung cancer: combined high CXCL16 expression in tumor stroma and cancer cells yields improved survival

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, May 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Title
Prognostic impact of CXCL16 and CXCR6 in non-small cell lung cancer: combined high CXCL16 expression in tumor stroma and cancer cells yields improved survival
Published in
BMC Cancer, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1446-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sigurd M. Hald, Yury Kiselev, Samer Al-Saad, Elin Richardsen, Charles Johannessen, Marte Eilertsen, Thomas K. Kilvaer, Khalid Al-Shibli, Sigve Andersen, Lill-Tove Busund, Roy M. Bremnes, Tom Donnem

Abstract

The chemokine CXCL16 and its receptor CXCR6 are expressed by a variety of immune cells and have been shown to influence angiogenesis. The expression of CXCR6 and CXCL16 has been examined in numerous human cancers; however no studies have yet investigated their influence on prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to explore their prognostic significance in NSCLC, in addition to examining associations with previously investigated markers. Resected tumor tissue from 335 consecutive unselected stage I-IIIA NSCLC patients (1990-2005) were collected. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of CXCR6 and CXCL16 on tissue microarrays. In vitro, NSCLC cells (NCI-H460, A549 cells) were transfected with CXCL16 siRNA to examine effects on proliferation. In univariate analysis, ↑ stromal cell CXCL16 expression was a significant positive prognostic factor (P = 0.016). CXCR6 was expressed in cancer cells, but did not show any prognostic impact. In the multivariate analysis, combined ↑cancer, and ↑stromal cell CXCL16 expression was an independent positive prognostic factor when compared to ↓stromal and ↓cancer cell expression (HR: 0.42; 95 % CI: 0.20-0.88; P = 0.022). Knockdown of CXCL16 by siRNA resulted in accelerated proliferation of NSCLC cell lines. We have shown that combined ↑cancer and ↑stromal cell CXCL16 expression is an independent positive prognostic factor in NSCLC. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the biological mechanism underlying this finding.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 38%
Professor 1 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 63%
Unknown 3 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2015.
All research outputs
#3,411,146
of 5,165,331 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,551
of 2,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,079
of 173,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#135
of 212 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,165,331 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,851 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 212 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.