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Assembly, trafficking and function of α1β2γ2 GABAAreceptors are regulated by N-terminal regions, in a subunit-specific manner

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurochemistry, June 2015
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Title
Assembly, trafficking and function of α1β2γ2 GABAAreceptors are regulated by N-terminal regions, in a subunit-specific manner
Published in
Journal of Neurochemistry, June 2015
DOI 10.1111/jnc.13175
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lik-Wei Wong, Han-Shen Tae, Brett A. Cromer

Abstract

GABAA receptors are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGIC) that mediate inhibitory fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. Consistent with recent pLGIC structures, sequence analysis predicts an α-helix near the N-terminus of each GABAA receptor subunit. Preceding each α-helix are 8-36 additional residues, which we term the N-terminal extension. In homomeric GABAC receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), the N-terminal α-helix is functionally essential. Here we determined the role of the N-terminal extension and putative α-helix in heteromeric α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors. This role was most prominent in the α1 subunit, with deletion of the N-terminal extension or further deletion of the putative α-helix both dramatically reduced the number of functional receptors at the cell surface. Conversely, deletion of the β2 or γ2 N-terminal extension had little effect on the number of functional cell-surface receptors. Additional deletion of the putative α-helix in the β2 or γ2 subunits did, however, decrease both functional cell surface receptors and incorporation of the γ2 subunit into mature receptors. In the β2 subunit only, α-helix deletions affected GABA sensitivity and desensitization. Our findings demonstrate that N-terminal extensions and α-helices make key subunit-specific contributions to assembly, consistent with both regions being involved in inter-subunit interactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Austria 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 26%
Researcher 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 26%
Neuroscience 5 22%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 17%
Psychology 1 4%
Physics and Astronomy 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2015.
All research outputs
#10,944,471
of 12,349,730 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurochemistry
#5,456
of 5,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,011
of 237,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurochemistry
#85
of 108 outputs
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