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Immunoglobulins stimulate cultured Schwann cell maturation and promote their potential to induce axonal outgrowth

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, May 2015
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2 tweeters

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Title
Immunoglobulins stimulate cultured Schwann cell maturation and promote their potential to induce axonal outgrowth
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12974-015-0331-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nevena Tzekova, André Heinen, Sebastian Bunk, Corinna Hermann, Hans-Peter Hartung, Birgit Reipert, Patrick Küry

Abstract

Schwann cells are the myelinating glial cells of the peripheral nervous system and exert important regenerative functions revealing them as central repair components of many peripheral nerve pathologies. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) are widely used to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases including immune-mediated neuropathies. Nevertheless, promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration is currently an unmet therapeutical goal. We therefore examined whether immunoglobulins affect glial cell homeostasis, differentiation, and Schwann cell dependent nerve regenerative processes. The responses of different primary Schwann cell culture models to IVIG were investigated: immature or differentiation competent Schwann cells, myelinating neuron/glial cocultures, and dorsal root ganglion explants. Immature or differentiating Schwann cells were used to study cellular proliferation, morphology, and gene/protein expression. Myelination rates were determined using myelinating neuron/glia cocultures, whereas axonal outgrowth was assessed using non-myelinating dorsal root ganglion explants. We found that IVIG specifically bind to Schwann cells and detected CD64 Fc receptor expression on their surface. In response to IVIG binding, Schwann cells reduced proliferation rates and accelerated growth of cellular protrusions. Furthermore, we observed that IVIG treatment transiently boosts myelin gene expression and myelination-related signaling pathways of immature cells, whereas in differentiating Schwann cells, myelin expression is enhanced on a long-term scale. Importantly, myelin gene upregulation was not detected upon application of IgG1 control antibodies. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that Schwann cells secrete interleukin-18 upon IVIG stimulation and that this cytokine instructs these cells to promote axonal growth. We conclude that IVIG can positively influence the Schwann cell differentiation process and that it enhances their regenerative potential.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Researcher 4 25%
Student > Postgraduate 3 19%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 5 31%
Unspecified 4 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,550,255
of 5,165,331 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#371
of 795 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,502
of 173,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#31
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,165,331 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 795 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,006 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.