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When Siberia came to the Netherlands: the response of continental black-tailed godwits to a rare spring weather event

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 1,880)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
73 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
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Title
When Siberia came to the Netherlands: the response of continental black-tailed godwits to a rare spring weather event
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, May 2015
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12381
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathan R. Senner, Mo A. Verhoeven, José M. Abad-Gómez, Jorge S. Gutiérrez, Jos C. E. W. Hooijmeijer, Rosemarie Kentie, José A. Masero, T. Lee Tibbitts, Theunis Piersma

Abstract

Extreme weather events have the potential to alter both short- and long-term population dynamics as well as community- and ecosystem-level function. Such events are rare and stochastic, making it difficult to fully document how organisms respond to them and predict the repercussions of similar events in the future. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which short-term events can incur long-term consequences, we documented the behavioural responses and fitness consequences for a long-distance migratory bird, the continental black-tailed godwit Limosa limosa limosa, resulting from a spring snowstorm and three-week period of record low temperatures. The event caused measurable responses at three spatial scales - continental, regional and local - including migratory delays (+19 days), reverse migrations (>90 km), elevated metabolic costs (+8·8% maintenance metabolic rate) and increased foraging rates (+37%). There were few long-term fitness consequences, however, and subsequent breeding seasons instead witnessed high levels of reproductive success and little evidence of carry-over effects. This suggests that populations with continued access to food, behavioural flexibility and time to dissipate the costs of the event can likely withstand the consequences of an extreme weather event. For populations constrained in one of these respects, though, extreme events may entail extreme ecological consequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 73 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Norway 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 83 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 20%
Student > Master 18 20%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Unspecified 8 9%
Other 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 61%
Environmental Science 18 20%
Unspecified 7 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 6 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 102. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2019.
All research outputs
#145,534
of 13,038,232 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#26
of 1,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,196
of 232,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#2
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,038,232 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,880 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,874 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.