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Reduced tubular degradation of glomerular filtered plasma albumin is a common feature in acute and chronic kidney disease

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical & Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology, November 2017
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Title
Reduced tubular degradation of glomerular filtered plasma albumin is a common feature in acute and chronic kidney disease
Published in
Clinical & Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology, November 2017
DOI 10.1111/1440-1681.12878
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yingjie Han, Nguyen D K Ly, Greg H Tesch, Philip Poronnik, David J Nikolic-Paterson

Abstract

Tubular epithelial cells take up and degrade plasma albumin filtered by the glomerulus. Tubular damage resulting in reduced albumin uptake or degradation has been suggested as one mechanism contributing to albuminuria in kidney disease. This study investigated whether albumin uptake or degradation is altered in acute and chronic glomerular disease. Mouse models of acute glomerular injury (anti-GBM disease and LPS-induced albuminuria) and chronic disease (streptozotocin-induced diabetes and db/db mice) were examined. Mice were injected intravenously with Alexa-albumin plus DQ-albumin and euthanized 20 minutes later. Tubular uptake of albumin (Alexa-albumin) and albumin degradation (Dye Quenched (DQ)-albumin) was assessed in tissue sections via confocal microscopy. Tubular uptake of Alexa-albumin in the models of diabetic nephropathy was not different to normal mice. However, the fluorescence signal resulting from degradation of DQ-albumin was significantly reduced in db/db mice, and the ratio of degraded to intact albumin was reduced in both models. The ratio of degraded to intact albumin in tubules was also reduced in the anti-GBM model. In the LPS model, both tubular uptake and degradation of albumin were significantly reduced, with a substantial reduction in the ratio of degraded to intact albumin in tubules. LPS stimulation of cultured tubular epithelial cells inhibited albumin uptake, indicating a direct role for LPS in modifying tubular handling of albumin. In conclusion, reduced degradation of filtered albumin in the proximal tubule is a common feature of glomerular diseases. This may be a general mechanism whereby tubular dysfunction contributes to development of albuminuria. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 33%
Researcher 2 33%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 33%
Chemistry 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2019.
All research outputs
#12,139,589
of 15,268,406 outputs
Outputs from Clinical & Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology
#771
of 1,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#207,721
of 277,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical & Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology
#5
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,268,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,051 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,906 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.