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Genetic and Epigenetic Features of Rapidly Progressing IDH-Mutant Astrocytomas

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, May 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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5 Mendeley
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Title
Genetic and Epigenetic Features of Rapidly Progressing IDH-Mutant Astrocytomas
Published in
Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, May 2018
DOI 10.1093/jnen/nly026
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy E Richardson, Adwait Amod Sathe, Mohammed Kanchwala, Gaoxiang Jia, Amyn A Habib, Guanghua Xiao, Matija Snuderl, Chao Xing, Kimmo J Hatanpaa

Abstract

IDH-mutant astrocytomas are significantly less aggressive than their IDH-wildtype counterparts. We analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset (TCGA) and identified a small group of IDH-mutant, WHO grade II-III astrocytomas (n = 14) with an unexpectedly poor prognosis characterized by a rapid progression to glioblastoma and death within 3 years of the initial diagnosis. Compared with IDH-mutant tumors with the typical, extended progression-free survival in a control group of age-similar patients, the tumors in the rapidly progressing group were characterized by a markedly increased level of overall copy number alterations ([CNA]; p = 0.006). In contrast, the mutation load was similar, as was the methylation pattern, being consistent with IDH-mutant astrocytoma. Two of the gliomas (14%) in the rapidly progressing, IDH-mutant group but none of the other grade II-III gliomas in the TCGA (n = 283) had pathogenic mutations in genes (FANCB and APC) associated with maintaining chromosomal stability. These results suggest that chromosomal instability can negate the beneficial effect of IDH mutations in WHO II-III astrocytomas. The mechanism of the increased CNA is unknown but in some cases appears to be due to mutations in genes with a role in chromosomal stability. Increased CNA could serve as a biomarker for tumors at risk for rapid progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 60%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 40%
Unspecified 1 20%
Neuroscience 1 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2019.
All research outputs
#7,348,787
of 13,599,972 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
#862
of 1,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,501
of 269,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
#6
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,599,972 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,286 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.