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GPS tracking for mapping seabird mortality induced by light pollution

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
64 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
136 Mendeley
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Title
GPS tracking for mapping seabird mortality induced by light pollution
Published in
Scientific Reports, June 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep10670
Pubmed ID
Authors

Airam Rodríguez, Beneharo Rodríguez, Juan J. Negro

Abstract

Light pollution and its consequences on ecosystems are increasing worldwide. Knowledge on the threshold levels of light pollution at which significant ecological impacts emerge and the size of dark refuges to maintain natural nocturnal processes is crucial to mitigate its negative consequences. Seabird fledglings are attracted by artificial lights when they leave their nest at night, causing high mortality. We used GPS data-loggers to track the flights of Cory's shearwater Calonectris diomedea fledglings from nest-burrows to ground, and to evaluate the light pollution levels of overflown areas on Tenerife, Canary Islands, using nocturnal, high-resolution satellite imagery. Birds were grounded at locations closer than 16 km from colonies in their maiden flights, and 50% were rescued within a 3 km radius from the nest-site. Most birds left the nests in the first three hours after sunset. Rescue locations showed radiance values greater than colonies, and flight distance was positively related to light pollution levels. Breeding habitat alteration by light pollution was more severe for inland colonies. We provide scientific-based information to manage dark refuges facilitating that fledglings from inland colonies reach the sea successfully. We also offer methodological approaches useful for other critically threatened petrel species grounded by light pollution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 1%
Israel 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 127 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 18%
Researcher 24 18%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Other 12 9%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 14 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 41%
Environmental Science 33 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 4%
Physics and Astronomy 6 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 3%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 19 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 59. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2020.
All research outputs
#394,852
of 16,142,557 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#4,565
of 85,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,730
of 237,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#156
of 3,754 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,142,557 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85,357 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,754 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.