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Regulation of learning and memory by meningeal immunity: a key role for IL-4

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, May 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
424 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
497 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Regulation of learning and memory by meningeal immunity: a key role for IL-4
Published in
The Journal of Experimental Medicine, May 2010
DOI 10.1084/jem.20091419
Pubmed ID
Authors

Noël C. Derecki, Amber N. Cardani, Chun Hui Yang, Kayla M. Quinnies, Anastasia Crihfield, Kevin R. Lynch, Jonathan Kipnis

Abstract

Proinflammatory cytokines have been shown to impair cognition; consequently, immune activity in the central nervous system was considered detrimental to cognitive function. Unexpectedly, however, T cells were recently shown to support learning and memory, though the underlying mechanism was unclear. We show that one of the steps in the cascade of T cell-based support of learning and memory takes place in the meningeal spaces. Performance of cognitive tasks led to accumulation of IL-4-producing T cells in the meninges. Depletion of T cells from meningeal spaces skewed meningeal myeloid cells toward a proinflammatory phenotype. T cell-derived IL-4 was critical, as IL-4(-/-) mice exhibited a skewed proinflammatory meningeal myeloid cell phenotype and cognitive deficits. Transplantation of IL-4(-/-) bone marrow into irradiated wild-type recipients also resulted in cognitive impairment and proinflammatory skew. Moreover, adoptive transfer of T cells from wild-type into IL-4(-/-) mice reversed cognitive impairment and attenuated the proinflammatory character of meningeal myeloid cells. Our results point to a critical role for T cell-derived IL-4 in the regulation of cognitive function through meningeal myeloid cell phenotype and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. These findings might lead to the development of new immune-based therapies for cognitive impairment associated with immune decline.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 497 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 2%
Portugal 2 <1%
South Africa 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 476 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 128 26%
Researcher 82 16%
Student > Bachelor 63 13%
Student > Master 47 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 38 8%
Other 95 19%
Unknown 44 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 127 26%
Neuroscience 107 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 60 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 45 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 39 8%
Other 45 9%
Unknown 74 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 106. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2021.
All research outputs
#228,625
of 17,360,236 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Experimental Medicine
#123
of 10,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,004
of 120,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Experimental Medicine
#1
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,360,236 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,459 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.