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Asymptomatic spread of huanglongbing and implications for disease control

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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71 Dimensions

Readers on

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129 Mendeley
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Title
Asymptomatic spread of huanglongbing and implications for disease control
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1508253112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jo Ann Lee, Susan E. Halbert, William O. Dawson, Cecile J. Robertson, James E. Keesling, Burton H. Singer

Abstract

Huanglongbing (HLB) is a bacterial infection of citrus trees transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. Mitigation of HLB has focused on spraying of insecticides to reduce the psyllid population and removal of trees when they first show symptoms of the disease. These interventions have been only marginally effective, because symptoms of HLB do not appear on leaves for months to years after initial infection. Limited knowledge about disease spread during the asymptomatic phase is exemplified by the heretofore unknown length of time from initial infection of newly developing cluster of young leaves, called flush, by adult psyllids until the flush become infectious. We present experimental evidence showing that young flush become infectious within 15 d after receiving an inoculum of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (bacteria). Using this critical fact, we specify a microsimulation model of asymptomatic disease spread and intensity in a grove of citrus trees. We apply a range of psyllid introduction scenarios to show that entire groves can become infected with up to 12,000 psyllids per tree in less than 1 y, before most of the trees show any symptoms. We also show that intervention strategies that reduce the psyllid population by 75% during the flushing periods can delay infection of a full grove, and thereby reduce the amount of insecticide used throughout a year. This result implies that psyllid surveillance and control, using a variety of recently available technologies, should be used from the initial detection of invasion and throughout the asymptomatic period.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Israel 1 <1%
Unknown 126 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 15%
Student > Master 18 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 9%
Student > Bachelor 9 7%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 19 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 73 57%
Environmental Science 9 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 6%
Mathematics 6 5%
Computer Science 3 2%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 23 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2015.
All research outputs
#7,424,154
of 12,365,234 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#67,395
of 77,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,317
of 237,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#851
of 1,035 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,365,234 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,344 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.0. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,742 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,035 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.