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Healthcare resource utilization and costs of outpatient follow-up after liver transplantation in a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil: cost description study.

Overview of attention for article published in Sao Paulo Medical Journal, December 2014
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2 tweeters

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Title
Healthcare resource utilization and costs of outpatient follow-up after liver transplantation in a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil: cost description study.
Published in
Sao Paulo Medical Journal, December 2014
DOI 10.1590/1516-3180.2013.7000011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Soárez, Patricia Coelho de, Lara, Amanda Nazareth, Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam, Abdala, Edson, Haddad, Luciana Bertocco de Paiva, D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro, Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

Abstract

Data on the costs of outpatient follow-up after liver transplantation are scarce in Brazil. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the direct medical costs of the outpatient follow-up after liver transplantation, from the first outpatient visit after transplantation to five years after transplantation. Cost description study conducted in a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Cost data were available for 20 adults who underwent liver transplantation due to acute liver failure (ALF) from 2005 to 2009. The data were retrospectively retrieved from medical records and the hospital accounting information system from December 2010 to January 2011. Mean cost per patient/year was R$ 13,569 (US$ 5,824). The first year of follow-up was the most expensive (R$ 32,546 or US$ 13,968), and medication was the main driver of total costs, accounting for 85% of the total costs over the five-year period and 71.9% of the first-year total costs. In the second year after transplantation, the mean total costs were about half of the amount of the first-year costs (R$ 15,165 or US$ 6,509). Medication was the largest contributor to the costs followed by hospitalization, over the five-year period. In the fourth year, the costs of diagnostic tests exceeded the hospitalization costs. This analysis provides significant insight into the costs of outpatient follow-up after liver transplantation due to ALF and the participation of each cost component in the Brazilian setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Unknown 14 88%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Unknown 14 88%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2016.
All research outputs
#7,507,364
of 9,726,436 outputs
Outputs from Sao Paulo Medical Journal
#37
of 70 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,921
of 226,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sao Paulo Medical Journal
#2
of 4 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 70 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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