A New Horned Dinosaur Reveals Convergent Evolution in Cranial Ornamentation in Ceratopsidae

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 6,503)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
73 news outlets
blogs
27 blogs
twitter
944 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
33 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
Title
A New Horned Dinosaur Reveals Convergent Evolution in Cranial Ornamentation in Ceratopsidae
Published in
Current Biology, June 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2015.04.041
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brown, Caleb M, Henderson, Donald M, Caleb M. Brown, Donald M. Henderson

Abstract

Ceratopsid (horned) dinosaurs are an iconic group of large-bodied, quadrupedal, herbivorous dinosaurs that evolved in the Late Cretaceous and were largely restricted to western North America [1-5]. Ceratopsids are easily recognized by their cranial ornamentation in the form of nasal and postorbital horns and frill (capped by epiossifications); these structures show high morphological disparity and also represent the largest cranial display structures known to have evolved [2, 4]. Despite their restricted occurrence in time and space, this group has one of the best fossil records within Dinosauria, showing a rapid diversification in horn and frill morphology [1]. Here a new genus and species of chasmosaurine ceratopsid is described based on a nearly complete and three-dimensionally preserved cranium recovered from the uppermost St. Mary River Formation (Maastrichtian) of southwestern Alberta. Regaliceratops peterhewsi gen. et sp. nov. exhibits many unique characters of the frill and is characterized by a large nasal horncore, small postorbital horncores, and massive parietal epiossifications. Cranial morphology, particularly the epiossifications, suggests close affinity with the late Campanian/early Maastrichian taxon Anchiceratops, as well as with the late Maastrichtian taxon Triceratops. A median epiparietal necessitates a reassessment of epiossification homology and results in a more resolved phylogeny. Most surprisingly, Regaliceratops exhibits a suite of cranial ornamentations that are superficially similar to Campanian centrosaurines, indicating both exploration of novel display morphospace in Chasmosaurinae, especially Maastrichtian forms, and convergent evolution in horn morphology with the recently extinct Centrosaurinae. This marks the first time that evolutionary convergence in horn-like display structures has been demonstrated between dinosaur clades, similar to those seen in fossil and extant mammals [6].

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 5 6%
United States 3 4%
Italy 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 65 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 23%
Student > Master 14 18%
Other 14 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Other 10 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 42%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 17%
Linguistics 9 12%
Engineering 5 6%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Other 14 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1510. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2017.
All research outputs
#506
of 7,432,514 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#7
of 6,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20
of 216,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#1
of 209 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,432,514 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,503 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 209 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.