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Long-term Changes in Soil and Stream Chemistry across an Acid Deposition Gradient in the Northeastern United States

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2018
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Title
Long-term Changes in Soil and Stream Chemistry across an Acid Deposition Gradient in the Northeastern United States
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2018
DOI 10.2134/jeq2017.08.0335
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason Siemion, Michael R. McHale, Gregory B. Lawrence, Douglas A. Burns, Michael Antidormi

Abstract

Declines in acidic deposition across Europe and North America have led to decreases in surface water acidity and signs of chemical recovery of soils from acidification. To better understand the link between recovery of soils and surface waters, chemical trends in precipitation, soils, and streamwater were investigated in three watersheds representing a depositional gradient from high to low across the northeastern United States. Significant declines in concentrations of H (ranging from -1.2 to -2.74 microequivalents [μeq] L yr), NO (ranging from -0.6 to -0.84 μeq L yr), and SO (ranging from -0.95 to -2.13 μeq L yr) were detected in precipitation in the three watersheds during the period 1999 to 2013. Soil chemistry in the A horizon of the watershed with the greatest decrease in deposition showed significant decreases in exchangeable Al and increases in exchangeable bases. Soil chemistry did not significantly improve during the study in the other watersheds, and base saturation in the Oa and upper B horizons significantly declined in the watershed with the smallest decrease in deposition. Streamwater SO concentrations significantly declined in all three streams (ranging from -2.01 to -2.87 μeq L yr) and acid neutralizing capacity increased (ranging from 1.38 to 1.60 μeq L yr) in the two streams with the greatest decreases in deposition. Recovery of soils has likely been limited by decades of acid deposition that have leached base cations from soils with base-poor parent material.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 38%
Other 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Unspecified 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 3 38%
Unspecified 2 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 25%
Engineering 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2018.
All research outputs
#9,296,198
of 12,104,225 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1,362
of 1,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,416
of 256,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#16
of 23 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,677 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.